Accessibility links

Zambia Presidential Aspirant


In Zambia, the presidential candidate of the united democratic alliance, Hakainda Hichelema is urging Zambians to challenge politicians to talk about facts rather than assumptions. He adds that poverty is rife among the majority of Zambians and asked the electorate to ensure that the politician’s account for what they promise. Hichilema said he is a strong individual who want everything to be done correctly and effectively, and the UDA will run Zambia on a building block basis and will not discard what the previous government has done if it emerges victorious.

Hichelema said he is a strong individual who want everything to be done correctly and effectively, and the UDA will run Zambia on a building block basis and will not discard what the previous government has done if it emerges victorious. He appealed to the people of Northern Province not to sell their voter cards but instead use them during this month's elections.

The UDA leader said those who are selling cards would not solve the problem of hunger and poverty affecting most areas in the country. He is also reported to have said on a radio in Kasama in Northern Province that many Zambians are suffering and it is important to challenge the politicians to talks about matters that affect the majority.

Meanwhile Zambia's founding president Kenneth Kaunda on Wednesday put his weight behind Hichelema saying he is the best candidate to run the country.

Hichelema spoke with VOA English to Africa reporter Peter Clottey about his call for Zambians to challenge politicians in the country.

“Basically what I was pointing out to our electorates is that, they should interrogate us as politicians when we raise issues, when we make claims that the economy has done well, one basically needs to look at the measures of the economy perception of doing well. if you look at GDP per capita, if a politician is standing on a platform and says poverty levels have reduced when statistics show that we have worsening poverty levels, that is misleading the electorate. And I will like the electorate to actually ask us to say things that are factual and therefore if we are factual, we are likely to redress the problem that our country is facing,” he said.

He dispels the notion held by some Zambians that he is a political novice.” Probably those are Zambian living outside the country who have not been in Zambia for long. When you are in Zambia, you see the levels of poverty like I am seeing everyday; you really can’t turn your eye away. And mind away and believe that the current crop of politicians will address the situation. The sad aspect is that, they are incapable of doing that, I’m sorry to say because the situation is degenerating. My country my colleague, this time does not need political experience, which does not deliver better living standards for our people. What we need now as Africa the era of economic liberation is where we are in. We’ve had our political liberation, we’ve had our democratic liberation what this country needs now is a different leader with a skill set that is focus on if you like biased towards economic and business development through, which we can deal with our social degradation,”

“What political experience is there, when the situation is getting worse? He quipped.

He explains his plans for the first hundred days in office.” ... the first thing we are going to do is to give Zambians the fundamental law, the constitution, which our friends in government have failed to give the people of Zambia for five years. Want the people of Zambia; to get a constitution that provides for the separation of powers, that way we know that we can begin to lay the foundation upon which the democratic principles are founded. I would also like us to redress the electoral law, which has been enacted by the present government. Because it contravenes the draft provision of the constitution, would you know at the moment we have a constitution, which is so bad that someone can be a president with twenty percent vote. You cannot govern with such a minority vote, one needs a legitimacy to be able to govern a country like ours,” he said.

Let us know what you think of this report and other stories on our website. Send your views to AFRICA@VOANEWS.COM, and include your phone number. Or, call us here in Washington, DC at (202) 205-9942. After you hear the VOA identification, press 30 to leave a message. We want to hear what you have to say!

XS
SM
MD
LG