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China's Premier Promises Higher Food Standards, More Tainted Products Found

Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao promised Saturday that his country's food exports would win the trust of people around the world even as more tainted products were pulled from store shelves in Hong Kong and Thailand.

Mr. Wen said new legislation requiring greater government responsibility would make Chinese products meet the standards of importing countries.

Food safety has drawn renewed attention since Chinese-produced milk tainted with the toxic chemical melamine killed four babies in China and sickened tens of thousands more.

The chemical has since turned up in Chinese exports and food products manufactured in east Asia.

Hong Kong's Center for Food Safety said Saturday it had found the toxic chemical melamine in eggs imported from China and cookies baked in the Philippines.

Authorities in Thailand recalled two brands of snacks made in China and one made in Malaysia after finding they contained melamine.

Mr. Wen said the Chinese government was in part to blame for the recent tainted milk crisis and promised legislation to improve food safety.

The products found to contain melamine in Hong Kong are Select Fresh Brown Eggs from China and Croley Foods Sunflower Crackers from the Philippines.

Those found in Thailand are Chinese made Hajuku and Koala cookies and Malaysian-made Julie's peanut crackers.

China's parliament began debating a new food safety bill Thursday which would require greater government responsibility and ban all but authorized additives in food production.

China has arrested 42 people in the tainted milk scandal.

China's Health Ministry says more than 3,600 babies sickened by melamine are still in the hospital. Three of them are in serious condition. The ministry says about 46,000 others have been treated and released.

Melamine in large doses can cause kidney stones and lead to kidney failure.

China's food safety record has drawn international scrutiny since last year, when chemically-tainted toothpaste, pet food and other products made in China raised international concern.

Some information for this report was provided by AFP and AP.