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China Says Tibetan Separatism 'Doomed' 


China has harsh words for Tibet, saying it will never allow independence for a region that is internationally recognized as part of Chinese territory. Beijing's comments Tuesday came as Tibetan exiles hold a meeting in India to decide the future of their campaign against Chinese rule in their homeland. Stephanie Ho reports from the Chinese capital.

Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Qin Gang says the Chinese government's position on Tibet is "resolute."

Qin says any attempt to separate Tibet from Chinese territory will be "doomed." He also emphasized that what he describes as the "so-called Tibet government in exile" is not recognized by any other government.

The Chinese spokesman made comments directed at India, the country where many Tibetan exiles live and where Tibetan exiles are currently holding a crucial meeting.

The spokesman says China hopes and believes India will live up to its commitment to forbid any separatist activities on its territory.

Tibet's top spiritual leader, the Dalai Lama, fled to the Indian hill town, Dharmasala, following a failed uprising against Chinese rule in Tibet in 1959.

He has publicly advocated a plan that recognizes Tibet as part of China, but allows more autonomy for the region's unique culture and religion. Recently, though, the Dalai Lama said he is losing hope in his efforts.

China flatly rejects his plan as tantamount to Tibet independence.

Tibetan exile groups are meeting in Dharmasala this week to discuss the future of their cause.

Some Tibetans have grown impatient with the Dalai Lama's approach and insist on taking more drastic measures. They believe their homeland was an independent nation before Communist troops invaded in 1950.

China maintains that Tibet has been part of its territory for centuries.

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