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World Powers Want Direct Nuclear Talks with Iran


The five permanent members of the United Nations Security Council - the United States, Britain, China, France and Russia and Germany - said they are committed to direct talks with Iran to resolve a long-running nuclear standoff.

The so-called P5+1 nations made their comments Tuesday in a joint statement to the International Atomic Energy Agency's board of governors in Vienna.

The statement by the six nations, including the United States, was in contrast to the strategy of the previous U.S. administration of President George W. Bush, which preferred isolating rather than talking to U.S. foes. U.S. President Barack Obama has said his administration is willing to engage with Iran in talks.

The IAEA says Iran has 1,010 kilograms of low-grade enriched uranium, which can be used for nuclear energy. A more complicated process is needed to further enrich uranium into weapons-grade material, and it remains unclear if Iran is capable of doing that.

Iran says its nuclear work is peaceful and aimed at generating electricity.

Iran is under three rounds of U.N. sanctions for its disputed nuclear program.


Some information for this report was provided by AFP and Reuters.

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