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Labor Day Celebrated Across the US


It is Labor Day weekend here in the United States, a national holiday dating back more than 100 years. It is meant to honor the more than 155 million workers in the United States, and for most, it is a day of play.

For most Americans, Labor Day is more play than work. It is taking in a ball game with family and friends, picnicking, enjoying the beach or pool - cooling off. Labor Day is the traditional end of summer vacation.

An estimated 39 million Americans took to the road and airways this holiday weekend. That is about six million fewer than a year ago.

For young people, the holiday also means a new school year has either just begun or is about to.

America first celebrated Labor Day with a parade in New York September 5, 1882. Congress made Labor Day a national holiday in 1894. It honors the American worker, organized labor and a movement that helped to end child labor, and secure rights for workers.

There are still parades and events across the country that often attract politicians hoping to win supporters and votes.

This Labor Day, President Obama and America are still struggling with a U.S. economy that may be showing some signs of improving. And those that could vacation this holiday, are saying goodbye to summer and getting back to work.

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