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U.S. Proposes New Security Strategy - 2002-09-26


A new document, and a new strategy, for Iraq and the rest of the world. It's called “The National Security Strategy for the United States”, released Saturday. It says, "the (U.S.) will, if necessary, act pre-emptively. (It) cannot let (its) enemies strike first". The U.S. Secretary of State, Colin Powell.

COLIN POWELL, U.S. SECRETARY OF STATE
"When we see something coming at us we should take action to stop it."

Meaning anytime, anyone, and not just Osama bin Laden, or Saddam Hussein. Michael O'Hanlon, of the Brookings Institution, calls it clearly a policy of intimidation.

MICHAEL O'HANLON
"I think it's aimed at least as much at countries like Iran, that may be trying to get nuclear weapons, as it is at Iraq, which already knows that we're considering the threat of war."

Senator John McCain sees it as a "real danger", with other countries using it as an excuse.

SEN. JOHN McCAIN
"The imprisonment of the Falun Gong, the designation of some group out in western China as a terrorist group that we went along with. Clearly, the Russians have made threatening, not only noises, but actually military action in Georgia."

He says the difference is the U.S. has a case that can be made to the world through the U.N. SEN. JOHN McCAIN
"That is why I thought it was beneficial for the President to go to the United Nations."

Flying to Warsaw for a NATO meeting Tuesday, the U.S. Defense Secretary, Donald Rumsfeld, spoke with reporters on the plane.

DONALD RUMSFELD, U.S. DEFENSE SECRETARY
"What the President is trying to do, and what the Secretary of State is, at the United Nations, and what we will be doing at NATO is trying to help people 'connect the dots' before something happens, rather than afterward."

The strategy makes it clear the U.S. will seek allies in fighting its enemies. But if it must, will not hesitate to "go it alone."

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