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INDONESIA BLAST - 2002-10-16


In Bali, the Australian foreign minister, Alexander Downer visiting a morgue, where the difficult job of identifying bodies continues, many of them Australian, many the badly burned victims of the Saturday bombing, which ripped through nightclubs filled with foreign tourists. Almost 200 people were killed, more than 300 wounded, many are still missing. Some members of the Australian football team, several injured themselves, endured emotion-filled scenes. Survivor Eric de Haart.

ERIC DE HAART, TEAM MEMBER/SURVIVOR
"I think coming back, and facing all these people, alive, is probably the hardest thing I have to do. There is a fair amount of guilt there (breaks down)."

His plaintive question, "Why them, and not me?"

In Washington, the U.S. Secretary of State Colin Powell welcomed his British counterpart, foreign secretary Jack Straw.

COLIN POWELL, U.S. SECRETARY OF STATE
"We talked, as you might expect, about the terrible tragedy that took place in Bali over the weekend."

Secretary Straw spoke of the bombing as an "appalling atrocity” which killed and wounded British and Australian visitors to the resort.

JACK STRAW, BRITISH FOREIGN SECRETARY
"We believe that, at the moment, there are about 17 confirmed dead and up to a further 30 reported missing. The British Prime Minister, Tony Blair, has just given an oral statement in the House of Commons, condemning the atrocity."

TONY BLAIR, BRITISH PRIME MINISTER
"Discovering where, or how, they might strike next is hard. But, the message we send out, and should send out, is once again the same, one of total defiance, of determination in the face of this evil, to prosecute the fight against them the world over, till in time they are defeated."

Australia wants a Southeast Asian Islamic group added to the list of terror organizations. In Canberra, Prime Minister John Howard addressed the parliament Tuesday.

JOHN HOWARD, AUSTRALIAN PRIME MINISTER
"We would be moving, Mr. Speaker, as a government to have Jemaah Islamiah listed as a terrorist organization in the United Nations as soon as possible."

The U.S. ambassador to Australia says America will support that move. Western sources say several al-Qaida suspects being held by U.S authorities claim Jemaah Islamiah leaders helped al-Qaida plan terror attacks in Southeast Asia.

Earlier, U.S President George W. Bush spoke with Australia’s prime minister to express America’s "deepest sympathies" to the citizens of Australia, as well as to citizens around the world, calling the terrorist bombers "nothing but cold-blooded killers.”

U.S. PRESIDENT GEORGE W. BUSH
"They take no care for innocent life. They just blow up in the name of a religion which does not preach this kind of hatred, and violence."

In the past week, a French oil tanker was bombed off the coast of Yemen, an American Marine was killed, another wounded by two gunmen in Kuwait, and an audiotape said to be of an Osama bin Laden deputy called for more attacks on America and her allies. A member of the U.S. Senate's foreign intelligence committee, Richard Shelby.

SEN. RICHARD SHELBY (R-TENNESSEE)
"I believe this is the beginning of a lot more that we're gonna (going to) see."

President Bush says, "there's a lot more work to do."

U.S. PRESIDENT GEORGE W. BUSH
"They're trying to intimidate us, and we won't be intimidated."

In Bali, American FBI agents and Australian detectives have joined the hunt for the killers.

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