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Arab Public, Leaders Outraged by Amman Bombs


Al Qaida is claiming responsibility for the deadly hotel bombings that killed at least 56 people late Wednesday in Amman, while Arab leaders and the public are expressing outrage.

Lebanon's major TV stations broadcast and rebroadcast images of the hotel bombings in Amman, as many viewers choked back tears.

"Young people were getting married," protested a Lebanese mother named Oum Jihad, "the bombers are evil."

Newstands along Beirut's Hamra Street displayed a full array of gruesome pictures, as many readers muttered, complained or cursed the bombers.

A Lebanese professor named Abu Ziyad denounced the bombers saying they deserved summary justice:

"The United States of America and the United Nations should start thinking thoroughly about a better way against these fanatic people - do not send them to the judge, just kill them," said Abu Ziyad. "That is the only solution."

One Egyptian journalist, who identified himself as Mohanned, called the explosions, quote, "A dirty deed, a crime against all Arabs."

Egypt was the scene of several bloody suicide bombings in July at the tourist resort of Sharm el Sheikh.

Arab leaders in the Gulf and in Saudi Arabia expressed outrage, while officials from the Cairo-based Arab League also expressed stern condemnation.

Even Syria, which has had a history of prickly relations with Jordan, expressed "it's strongest possible condemnation," according to the official government daily al Ba'ath.

Many Lebanese expressed fear that such terror attacks would spread to their own country, but one bystander placed the fault squarely on Arab countries.

"Attacks like this will continue until all Arab countries cooperate in the war on terrorism," he said.

The terrorist organization al-Qaida claimed responsibility for the Amman bombings on the internet.

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