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Nepal's Three Main Parties Discuss Formation of New Government

  • Associated Press

Nepalese lawmakers attend constituent assembly session for the proclamation announcement of the adoption of the nation's new constitution in Kathmandu, Sep 20, 2015.

Nepalese lawmakers attend constituent assembly session for the proclamation announcement of the adoption of the nation's new constitution in Kathmandu, Sep 20, 2015.

Leaders of Nepal's three main political parties discussed formation of a new government on Monday following the adoption of a new constitution last month.

Narayankaji Shrestha of the United Communist Party of Nepal-Maoist said the parties are attempting to form a government with representation from the major political parties in parliament. He said they were unable to reach agreement on Monday but negotiations would continue.

Parliament is likely to vote next week on a prime minister to lead a new government. The constitution adopted on Sept. 20 by an overwhelming majority in the Constituent Assembly says a new government needs to take over soon, to be followed by vote on a new president to succeed Ram Baran Yadav, the first president since the Himalayan nation was declared a republic.

Khadga Prasad Oli of the Communist Party of Nepal-Unified Marxist Leninist is expected to be the new prime minister.

Current Prime Minister Sushil Koirala and Oli's party formed a coalition government in 2014 after the two parties together won nearly two-thirds of the seats in parliament. Koirala, the leader of the larger party, became the first prime minister and it was believed that Koirala and Oli would swap after the constitution was adopted.

Protesters unhappy with the new constitution have been protesting in southern Nepal, causing highways and border points to be closed. Neighboring India, also not pleased with the constitution, has imposed an unofficial blockade, restricting fuel and other supplies to Nepal.

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