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Boston Globe Publishes Satirical Page Showing 'Trump's America'

  • Chris Hannas

A portion of a satirical front page of The Boston Globe published on the newspaper's website, April 9, 2016. The paper's editorial board used the parody to express its uneasiness with a potential Donald Trump presidency.

A portion of a satirical front page of The Boston Globe published on the newspaper's website, April 9, 2016. The paper's editorial board used the parody to express its uneasiness with a potential Donald Trump presidency.

The Boston Globe does not support Donald Trump's campaign for U.S. president.

The newspaper, one of the most prominent in the United States, published a page of fake articles Sunday that it said are a vision of how the United States will look if Trump wins.

"This is Donald Trump's America," the Globe said. "What you read on this page is what might happen if the GOP (Republican) front-runner can put his ideas into practice, his words into action. Many Americans might find this vision appealing, but the Globe's editorial board finds it deeply troubling."

There is a long history of newspapers endorsing candidates in the United States, usually with an article written by the editorial board that lays out why voters should support that candidate and not their opponents.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump acknowledges supporters while leaving Trump Tower on his way to visit the World Trade Center Museum, in New York, April 9, 2016.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump acknowledges supporters while leaving Trump Tower on his way to visit the World Trade Center Museum, in New York, April 9, 2016.

The Globe's approach is unique, with the mock front page dated April 17, 2017, featuring a large banner headline declaring "Deportations to Begin."

The accompanying article has Trump calling on Congress to create a "massive deportation force" while protesters rally against his policies outside the White House.

Controversial campaign promises

The page further highlights Trump's most controversial campaign promises, including his plan to build a wall at the Mexican border and renegotiate trade deals.

One article notes a stock market plunge following the Trump administration's announcement of massive new tariffs on Chinese and Mexican imports.

Another article discusses the refusal of U.S. soldiers to carry out Trump's orders to kill the families of Islamic State militants.

The Globe satirically predicts Trump being nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize because of his work in uniting Sunni and Shi'ite Muslims, presumably against the United States.

FILE - Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally, April 6, 2016, in Bethpage, N.Y.

FILE - Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally, April 6, 2016, in Bethpage, N.Y.

​Trump's use of Twitter also gets some attention in an article about him angering China by naming his new dog after the country's first lady.

"I don't know why she's so offended, I love cute puppies and I love women!" the Globe imagines President Trump writing.

No immediate reaction

There was no immediate reaction from the Trump campaign to the satire. The page is not likely to soften Trump's stance toward the media, which he has often derided throughout his run for the Republican nomination.

One of the fake articles addresses Trump's stance, predicting a Republican-controlled Congress following through on his pledge to overhaul libel laws.

A more traditional editorial from the Globe calls Trumps vision for the country "as deeply disturbing as it is profoundly un-American."

It calls on Republicans to use every legitimate roadblock to block Trump from being the party's nominee, and to choose "an honorable and decent man" such as House Speaker Paul Ryan or former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney.

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