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Brazilian Official: Rousseff Undecided About 2014 Election


Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff delivers a speech as he attends the 4th Edition of the March of Daisies, an annual demonstration in support of women's rights in Brasilia, Brazil, Aug. 17, 2011

Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff delivers a speech as he attends the 4th Edition of the March of Daisies, an annual demonstration in support of women's rights in Brasilia, Brazil, Aug. 17, 2011

Brazil's communications minister says President Dilma Rousseff has not decided whether she or her predecessor, Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, will be their party's candidate in the 2014 election.

In an interview published Wednesday in the Brazilian newspaper, Folha de S. Paulo, Paulo Bernardo said Rousseff would be the likely candidate if she desires to run.

But Bernardo said Rousseff and her very popular predecessor must first talk to decide which one will be the 2014 presidential candidate for the ruling Workers' Party.

Rousseff took office January 1. Her government has since confronted political scandals and economic issues. Last week, police arrested the deputy tourism minister, Frederico da Costa, and at least 34 other people in a corruption sweep linked to funding for major sports events.

A recent poll showed that her personal approval rating has declined since March.

Earlier this year, Brazil's government announced $30 billion in budget cuts to curb rising inflation. Brazil is Latin America's biggest economy and is considered one of the world's major emerging economies.

Da Silva served two terms as Brazil's president from 2003 to 2010. He left office with approval ratings of about 80 percent. He picked Rousseff, a former government minister, to be his successor.

Brazilian law prohibits presidents from running for a third straight term.

Some information for this report was provided by AP, AFP and Reuters.

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