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Changes in Egypt Celebrated in Washington, New York

Egyptian Americans are rejoicing from Washington to New York City and beyond, after the end of President Hosni Mubarak’s regime. Our correspondent takes us to the celebrations.

Here's what freedom looks like outside the Egyptian Embassy in Washington:

Parents say they brought their American-born children here to "feel" the excitement of this historic time - when 18 days of protest brought down three decades of a regime.

"We're finally free and we can do whatever we want," said 11-year-old Dena Ahmed.

"They finally changed the president and everything in Egypt is over that was bad," said 10-year-old Youssef Ali.

Many say they are considering something they never thought they would: moving back home, to Egypt.

The Asy family came to the United States just 15 months ago.

"I can't find words to express my feeling. You can't imagine," said Ahmed Asy.

Now, Egypt holds a brighter future for their three young sons.

"They will correct everything. Education, health," said Walaa Abdehady. "Everything he destroyed."

A call comes in from Cairo. The music stops. And, each group congratulates the other.

Here's what freedom looks like in the "Little Egypt" section of New York:

Even a small group in New York City draws congratulations from stangers.

"It's the first time we have hope," said a participant. "We haven't had hope in years."

Hope that could now spread to neighboring countries. Hoda Mowari wears pink to support what she calls a people's movement in Yemen.

"Each person in Yemen has at least five different weapons so we want this revolution to be peacefully as the color pink," said Hoda Mowari. "So, if they throw us with weapons or any blood, we are going to return with flowers, pink roses."

"January 25th is officially the new birthday for all Egyptians," said Hossam Mansour in Northern Virginia.

It's the day the protests started in Cairo - the day that many hope will be a birth of democracy.

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    Carolyn Presutti

    Carolyn Presutti is an Emmy and Silver World Medal award winning television correspondent who works out of VOA’s Washington headquarters. She has also won numerous Associated Press TV, Radio, and Multimedia awards, as well as a Clarion for her TV coverage of The Syrian Medical Crisis, Haiti, The Boston Marathon Bombing, Presidential Politics, The Southern Economy, Google Glass & Other Wearables, and the 9/11 Anniversary.