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Chinese Premier Sees Strong Economic Growth for Country

  • VOA News

China's Premier Li Keqiang smiles as he is introduced at an event co-hosted by Chatham House and The International Institute for Strategic Studies at Mansion House in London, June 18, 2014.

China's Premier Li Keqiang smiles as he is introduced at an event co-hosted by Chatham House and The International Institute for Strategic Studies at Mansion House in London, June 18, 2014.

China's economy will not have a hard landing and will maintain medium to high growth in the long run, Premier Li Keqiang said on Wednesday.

Speaking during a visit to London, Li said he expected China's economy, the world's second largest after the United States, to grow at a minimum of 7.5 percent and the Consumer Price Index to grow by not more than 3.5 percent.

He said Beijing would not resort to “strong stimulus” but would rely on targeted measures to ensure growth was met.

“There have been some discussions saying that the Chinese economy is slowing down, they are worried whether the Chinese economy will head to a hard landing. Here I will be very frank and I will also make this point very solemnly: this will not happen,” Li said.

“I do believe that the Chinese economy will maintain medium to high level growth rate in the long run,” he said. “So the minimum growth rate we expect is 7.5 percent to ensure job creation and the ceiling that is CPI growth will not exceed 3.5 [percent] so that people's lives are not affected.”

In a speech at the Mansion House in London's financial district, Li said China would not resort to strong stimulus.

“We have the ability to maintain this targeted approach, we will not resort to strong stimulus, but rather smart and targeted regulation to ensure that major economic indicators, including the 7.5 percent growth target, remain and ensure a sustained rate in the future,” Li said.

On Thursday, Greece rolls out the red carpet for Li as the cash-strapped eurozone nation looks for Chinese investment.

Li's visit comes just a month after his Greek counterpart, Antonis Samaras, traveled to China to tout his troubled but improving economy as an attractive entry point for Chinese investment into the European Union.

With Greece now on the path to recovery, Li's two-day official visit to Athens marks Beijing's renewed interest in investment prospects up for grabs.

Chief among them is a 67-percent stake in the Piraeus port authority, the largest in the country.

Some information for this report provided by Reuters and AFP.
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