Accessibility links

USA

Crowds Gather for Hillary Clinton in NYC


Supporters for Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton listen as she speaks during a rally in New York on March 2, 2016.

Supporters for Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton listen as she speaks during a rally in New York on March 2, 2016.

Following a string of wins on Super Tuesday, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton held a public rally Wednesday in New York City where she spoke of her "commitment to raise wages and break down the barriers that hold too many families back."

Supporters queued in a line that coiled around New York City's massive Javits convention center, huddled close for a chance to see and hear the Democratic Party front-runner.

Among them were carpenters, asbestos workers, and other union members from across the city, who feel Clinton is the most reliable candidate to protect their interests.

"You have to give her a chance," said Brent Miller, a carpenter from Brooklyn.

Miller, who said his former projects include a Donald Trump building, said Clinton is the best choice for the future of construction. Trump, he maintained, "is no builder."

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton waves to supporters before speaking during a rally in New York on March 2, 2016.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton waves to supporters before speaking during a rally in New York on March 2, 2016.

"She supports our union members. She supports the middle class," added Toni Thomas, from the United Brotherhood of Carpenters.

Interwoven among the union members were ordinary New Yorkers, who said they saw Clinton as the Democratic Party's eventual nominee.

Campaign volunteer Anthony DeSimone, for his part, said he likes Clinton because he sees her as a "two-term candidate," best suited to carry out President Barack Obama's achievements, including Obamacare.

DeSimone argued that she sometimes gets a bad rap but is, in fact, "a lot like America."

"They love to hate her, but they love her, and she's the right person," DeSimone said. "She's like everyone."

Mansoor Khan, a Muslim-American, said he likes both Clinton and Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders, but argued that Sanders "doesn't connect to minorities." In addition, he said Sanders’ economic policies are too good to be true.

"We need to take a realistic, sensible approach, and that's why I think Hillary is a better candidate," Khan said.

XS
SM
MD
LG