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Egypt's Sissi Decrees Law on Repatriating Foreign Prisoners

  • Reuters

FILE - Egyptian President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi in a televised broadcast in Cairo, July 7, 2014.

FILE - Egyptian President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi in a televised broadcast in Cairo, July 7, 2014.

President Abdel Fattah el-Sissi issued a decree on Wednesday allowing him to repatriate foreign prisoners in Egypt, state media said, a move that could enable the release of an Al Jazeera journalist now serving a seven-year jail term.

Al Jazeera journalist Peter Greste looks out from the defendant's cage during a sentencing hearing in a courtroom in Cairo, Egypt, June 23, 2014.

Al Jazeera journalist Peter Greste looks out from the defendant's cage during a sentencing hearing in a courtroom in Cairo, Egypt, June 23, 2014.

Peter Greste, an Australian citizen, was sentenced in June along with Canadian-Egyptian national Mohamed Fahmy and Egyptian Baher Mohamed, all from the Qatar-based television network.

They were detained in December and convicted six months later of spreading lies to help a "terrorist organization" - an allusion to the Muslim Brotherhood outlawed after the army leb by Sissi toppled Egypt's first freely-elected civilian President Mohamed Morsi in July 2013.

Al Jazeera has said that the accusations against the three journalists are absurd. Western governments and human rights groups have condemned the case, with the United Nations questioning Egypt's reputation and the independence of its judiciary.

"The president issued a law on Wednesday allowing [him] to agree to surrender and transport non-Egyptian convicts and suspects to their countries to be tried or have their punishment implemented," the official news agency MENA said.

"This decision comes in the framework of upholding the nation's interests and preserving Egypt's international image...," MENA quoted presidential spokesman Alaa Yousef as saying.

The report did not mention the Al Jazeera journalists, but there are few other criminal cases involving foreigners in Egypt and none that have received as much international attention.

Sissi said in July that he wished the imprisoned Al Jazeera journalists had been deported and not put on trial.

He initially reacted to their sentencing by saying he would not interfere in court verdicts, but his subsequent comments suggested he might use his presidential power to pardon the journalists, who have an appeals hearing set for Jan. 1.

The Gulf state of Qatar, which funds Al Jazeera, supports the Brotherhood. Its relations with Egypt have been strained since Morsi's ouster following mass protests against his troubled one-year rule.

Sissi proceeded to crack down hard on Morsi's supporters in a campaign that has expanded to include secular and liberal activists, including some of the leading members of the 2011 popular uprising that ousted veteran autocrat Hosni Mubarak.

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