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FIFA Set for Elections as Bans Get Reduced

  • Reuters

FILE - Suspended FIFA President Sepp Blatter attends a news conference in Zurich, Switzerland, Dec. 21, 2015.

FILE - Suspended FIFA President Sepp Blatter attends a news conference in Zurich, Switzerland, Dec. 21, 2015.

World football's governing body FIFA will proceed with an election to pick a new president Friday to replace the disgraced Sepp Blatter and vote on a set of reforms aimed at restoring its credibility after the worst graft scandal in its history.

One candidate had sought to have the vote on a new president delayed but sport's highest tribunal threw out his request, clearing the way for FIFA to hold its planned Extraordinary Congress in Zurich.

FIFA urged members to approve its reforms at the congress, including term limits for top officials and disclosure of their earnings, to rebuild trust after several dozen officials were indicted in the United States and a criminal investigation was begun in Switzerland.

The Swiss Blatter, whose 18-year tenure officially ends this week, had hoped to attend the Congress but lost an appeal against his eight-year ban for ethics violations, meaning he must stay away.

The federation's appeal committee nevertheless reduced the suspension to six years in acknowledgement of Blatter's "services rendered to FIFA."

'Shameful' ruling

The committee also shaved two years off its suspension for European soccer boss Michel Platini, who had been favored to replace Blatter until an investigation began into a $2.03 million payment FIFA made to him in 2011 for work done a decade earlier.

FILE - UEFA President Michel Platini

FILE - UEFA President Michel Platini

"Mr. Platini's and Mr. Blatter's activities and the services they had rendered to FIFA, UEFA and football in general over the years should deserve appropriate recognition as a mitigating factor," the committee said.

Platini was not impressed.

"The decision is insulting, shameful and is a violation of rights," he said in a statement.

"The charges against me are baseless, built from the ground up and surreal in view of the facts and the explanations I gave during the hearing."

Five candidates are standing to replace Blatter to try to lead FIFA out of its crisis.

In a sign of the level of distrust over the election, candidate Prince Ali Bin Al Hussein of Jordan had asked the Court of Arbitration for Sport to delay the vote on concerns over the voting booths.