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Forster Promises Ghana ‘Unity Government’

  • Peter Clottey

Abu Sakara, CPP candidate in Ghana's presidential election. (Abu Sakara web site)

Abu Sakara, CPP candidate in Ghana's presidential election. (Abu Sakara web site)

In Ghana, the presidential candidate for the opposition Convention People’s Party (CPP) says Ghanaians should expect a unity government if he wins the December 7 presidential vote.

“For the first time we will have something approaching a unity government in which I will bring into government the best that the CPP has to offer, the best that the NDC [National Democratic Congress] has to offer, and the best that the NPP [New Patriotic Party] has to offer,” said Dr. Michael Abu Sakara Foster. “Because we want to reach across the political divide and start on a new platform to build a national consensus for the future of this country that we leave behind the acrimony, the political antagonisms that has prevented us from becoming who we can truly be,” he added.

Foster says he will select the best and the brightest across the country as part of an agenda to set a new course for a bright Ghana future.

A CPP administration, Foster says, will transform the country’s economy, strengthen its broken infrastructure and create jobs for the people by getting the country to work again.

Foster, who is an agricultural scientist, says he will work to end what he described as the political antagonism between the ruling NDC and the main opposition NPP, which he says is a detriment to the country.

“We all know that during their stewardship, this country has suffered the erosion of its manufacturing capacity to its lowest ebb ever, where we have now become a dependent economy, in spite of our new found oil and the highest ever prices for the major commodities that we trade on the global market; cocoa, gold, and timber notwithstanding,” said Foster.

Critics say the CPP is unlikely to win the presidential vote due to what they said are the enormous support both the ruling NDC and the main opposition NPP enjoy. Forster partially concurs with that valuation.

“The assertions are not wholly unjustified, because where we are starting from to where we want to be is a long stretch,” said Forster.

“I believe that in this election, the level of awareness and discernment among Ghanaian voters has reached the highest peak ever. And I believe it is going to meet the naivety that our politicians have shown in not recognizing that the old tricks will not work,” he continued, “and that this time they have to deliver real results they have to deliver promises that can be fulfilled and they have to be held accountable for their stewardship.”

Forster says his party could forge an alliance with other parties to win the presidential vote if it is unable to garner a majority vote to win the first round of the poll.

“You can count on us and you can be sure that we will continue to serve all Ghanaians with our utmost commitment to ensure that we build a new future that would bring prosperity for all Ghanaians,” he said.

The CPP says it has a track record to run on, especially, when it formed the first democratic government and ensured a united country devoid of tribalism following Ghana’s independence in 1957.

The CPP was the first party to form a government in the country’s history after it was led by founding President Osagyefo Dr. Kwame Nkrumah to gain independence from former colonial power, Britain.

Dr. Michael Abu Sakara Foster is married to Mary-Lily Kafela, who is an economist and business administrator. They have four children.

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