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Gallup: Muslim Americans' Optimism Growing


Boy Scout Omar Farooq, 12, presents the US flag for the pledge of allegiance to an audience of all faiths at the All Dulles Area Muslim Society mosque in Sterling, Virginia, March 6, 2011

Boy Scout Omar Farooq, 12, presents the US flag for the pledge of allegiance to an audience of all faiths at the All Dulles Area Muslim Society mosque in Sterling, Virginia, March 6, 2011

A survey by the Gallup polling organization indicates Muslim Americans feel more optimistic than in recent years, but are more critical of U.S. foreign policy.

A Dubai-based branch of the Gallup polling centers released results of a two-year survey on Tuesday that showed some 60 percent of American Muslims say they are "thriving," an increase of 19 percentage points since 2008.

Study authors say the change in outlook may be due to improved economic conditions and an 80 percent approval rating toward U.S. President Barack Obama, a Christian who has reached out to Muslim communities.

Muslim Americans had less confidence than other religious groups in law enforcement and the military. Just 60 percent said they had confidence in the FBI, compared to 75 percent or more for other groups. And they were more likely than any other religious group to say the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan were mistakes.

Gallup says the data was taken from a sample of 3,883 self-identified Muslim American adults from January 2008 to April 9, 2011. The confidence level in the data is 95 percent.

Some information for this report was provided by AP, AFP and Reuters.

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