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In Bolivia, A Leftist ... Clock?

  • Alex Villarreal

The hands and numbers on the clock at the legislative palace move in reverse in La Paz, Bolivia, June 24, 2014, in the latest symbolic gesture by President Evo Morales government asserting its revolutionary, "anti-colonial nature."

The hands and numbers on the clock at the legislative palace move in reverse in La Paz, Bolivia, June 24, 2014, in the latest symbolic gesture by President Evo Morales government asserting its revolutionary, "anti-colonial nature."

Bolivia now has a left-moving clock to match its left-leaning government.

This week, Congress altered the clock on its building in the Bolivian capital, La Paz.

The clock's hands and numbers now go left, instead of right, which is the typical clockwise direction.

Officials say the change is aimed at recovering the nation's indigenous and "southern" idenitity.

Bolivian Foreign Minister David Choquehuanca explained that because Bolivia is in the southern hemisphere, the hands of a clock should move with the sun in the opposite direction from the way they move in the north.

But not everyone is pleased. Opposition lawmakers have criticized the backwards clock, along with some residents in the capital.

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