Accessibility links

USA

Kazakhstan Cooperating with US on Boston Bombings

  • VOA News

This courtroom sketch signed by artist Jane Flavell Collins shows defendants Dias Kadyrbayev, left, and Azamat Tazhayakov appearing in front of Federal Magistrate Marianne Bowler at the Moakley Federal Courthouse in Boston, Mass., May 1, 2013.

This courtroom sketch signed by artist Jane Flavell Collins shows defendants Dias Kadyrbayev, left, and Azamat Tazhayakov appearing in front of Federal Magistrate Marianne Bowler at the Moakley Federal Courthouse in Boston, Mass., May 1, 2013.

Kazakhstan says it is cooperating with U.S. authorities, after two Kazakh nationals were arrested for obstructing the probe into the deadly Boston Marathon bombings.

A Kazakh Foreign Ministry statement says Kazakhstan condemns any form of terrorism.

On Wednesday, U.S. authorities arrested and charged the two Kazakh nationals and an American with obstruction of justice in the investigation into the Boston blasts.

The three young men attended the same Massachusetts college as alleged bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev. They are accused of helping Tsarnaev after the April 15 twin bombings that killed three people and wounded more than 260 others.

The Kazakhs, Dias Kadyrbayev and Azamat Tazhayakov, waived bail and will stay in jail at least until their next court appearance on May 14. The third suspect, U.S. citizen Robel Phillipos, was ordered held pending an upcoming court hearing.

Federal investigators accuse the three of conspiring to destroy a computer and a backpack containing fireworks that belonged to Tsarnaev, following the Boston bombings. The three face prison time and large fines if convicted.

In an interview last week with a Kazakh television channel, Murat Kadyrbayev said his son, Dias Kadyrbayev, had nothing to do with a crime in the Boston bombings case. At the time, Dias Kadyrbayev and Azamat Tazhayakov had not been charged with obstructing justice.

"We were shocked. Everyone knows my son. He has never fought anyone. He has never been in touch with any radicals. He does not go to the mosque, unless we go or there is another reason," said Kadyrbayev. "In the U.S., he has never been to a mosque."

Investigators believe Tsarnaev and his older brother Tamerlan, killed in a police shootout three days after the bombings, acted alone. Lawyers say the Kazakhs did not know Tsarnaev was the bomber until after the fact and have cooperated fully with the FBI.
XS
SM
MD
LG