Accessibility links

Kenya Civil Service Remains Neutral, Says Top Official

  • Peter Clottey

Kenya's President Mwai Kibaki (file photo)

Kenya's President Mwai Kibaki (file photo)

The head of Kenya’s Public Service has assured the public that his organization will remain neutral and continue to render quality services to all Kenyans despite disputes over the results of the March 4th presidential election.

“The public service has been non-partisan they continue to render services to the people,” said Public Service chief Francis Kimemia. “They stood in when the politicians went to vie for votes and they are still performing as politicians prepare to take oath in their respective offices.

“We continue to render quality service to our people [and] that is very important,” added Kimemia, “The public service must remain professional and be dedicated to serving Kenyans without fear or favor.”

Prime Minister Raila Odinga’s Coalition for Reforms and Democracy (CORD) has petitioned the Supreme Court challenging the outcome of the presidential election, citing voter irregularities and fraud.

Under Kenya’s constitution, the high court must give its judgment on the election within 14 days of the balloting.

Both local and international poll observers described the election as peaceful and credible.

Kimemia called on Kenyans to remain calm and peaceful as the Supreme Court adjudicates the election dispute.

“We urge our people to uphold peace and to continue to hold this country together, and focusing on development and improving the quality of life of our people… this is what the public service is concerned about,” he said.

Kimemia’s comments came after outgoing President Mwai Kibaki issued a directive Tuesday calling on recently elected ministers in the current administration to immediately resign.

“They should adhere to it immediately, since they are very familiar with the stipulations of the constitution,” Kimemia said. “That you cannot occupy two state offices at any one given time, and they are due to be sworn in by the speaker of the national assembly [parliament] or by the High Court judges for those who are going to the counties,” said Kimemia.

“Parliament has to convene,” continued Kimemia, “and in that sitting members of parliament, the senators the governors have to be sworn in. so you cannot be sworn in for another state office, while you are still occupying another state office.”
XS
SM
MD
LG