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Oprah: Lance Armstrong Has 'Come Clean' About Doping

  • VOA News

Lance Armstrong's reported admission to Oprah Winfrey that he used performance-enhancing drugs likely means he will go down in history as the most brazen drug cheat the sport has ever seen.

Lance Armstrong's reported admission to Oprah Winfrey that he used performance-enhancing drugs likely means he will go down in history as the most brazen drug cheat the sport has ever seen.

Talk show host Oprah Winfrey is confirming former world cycling champion Lance Armstrong has "come clean" about his use of performance enhancing drugs to help win the Tour de France.
Winfrey told CBS News Tuesday that she and Armstrong had agreed not to discuss the interview before it aired on her OWN network later this week. But she says she decided to come out and talk about the interview because the confession had "already been confirmed" by news sources.
Armstrong made the confession during an emotional interview Monday. Winfrey said Armstrong did not come clean in the manner that she expected, but that she "was satisfied by the answers.
The 41-year-old cancer survivor had long denied using performance-enhancing drugs, despite years of persistent rumors.
In August, Armstrong was stripped of his record seven Tour de France titles after the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency said it had proof he was centrally involved in a complex illegal doping program.

A number of other cyclists and former teammates testified against Armstrong during the probe.

Acting on the U.S. agency's recommendation, the International Cycling Union then stripped Armstrong of his Tour de France titles and banned him from any competition for life.

Earlier Monday, Armstrong apologized in person to the staff of his cancer charity for the scandal. Witnesses say Armstrong fought back tears as he gave what they call a sincere and heartfelt apology to his former colleagues.

Armstrong founded the Livestrong Foundation, based in Austin, Texas, but recently cut all ties to the group in an effort to prevent further negative publicity about its anti-cancer effort.

​The 41-year-old American athlete is also the subject of a lawsuit accusing him of defrauding the U.S. government during the years his team was sponsored by the U.S. Postal Service. The lawsuit was filed by former teammate Floyd Landis, who was stripped of his 2006 Tour de France victory after he was caught doping. Sources say Armstrong is in talks with the USPS to repay some of the money.

Armstrong could face prison time if the government were to file perjury charges against him for testimony he gave under oath to a federal grand jury in 2005.

He also is facing a lawsuit by the London-based Sunday Times to recover about $500,000 it paid to settle a libel lawsuit filed by Armstrong against the newspaper.

And the disgraced cyclist is facing demands that he return millions of dollars in awards and fees.

A U.S.-based promotions company is seeking repayment of a $7.5 million bonus awarded to Armstrong for one of his seven Tour de France victories. And Jay Weatherill, the premier of Australia's South Australia state, told reporters Tuesday his government would be "more than happy" for Armstrong to repay money he received to participate in the Tour Down Under race for three consecutive years, beginning in 2009.

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