Accessibility links

Michelle Obama Visits Botswana HIV/AIDS Clinic


U.S. first lady Michelle Obama, left, paints a mural with youths at Botswana-Baylor Adolescent Center which offers teenagers with HIV support, Gaborone, Botswana, Friday, June 24, 2011

U.S. first lady Michelle Obama, left, paints a mural with youths at Botswana-Baylor Adolescent Center which offers teenagers with HIV support, Gaborone, Botswana, Friday, June 24, 2011

U.S. first lady Michelle Obama helped paint an HIV/AIDS clinic on her first stop in Botswana on Friday.

Obama and family members traveling with her painted a mural at the Botswana-Baylor Adolescent Center of Excellence in the capital, Gaborone.

The mural is part of a facility that is being constructed to support children and teens infected with or affected by HIV-AIDS.

Related video of Michelle Obama's arrival in Botswana


Later, Obama attended a women's leadership conference where she again pushed for the empowerment of young women.

The first lady noted she came from humble means. But after attending college, she learned her success depended not on where she came from, but on how much she believed in herself and how hard she was willing to work.

Courtesy call


Mrs. Obama also visited with President Ian Khama. She was scheduled to visit a game reserve with her family on Friday evening.

Botswana is the second stop on her her two-nation tour of southern Africa to promote youth leadership and health and wellness.

Healthy living

On Thursday in South Africa, the first lady teamed up with Nobel Peace Prize laureate Desmond Tutu to promote healthy living. The first lady met with the archbishop emeritus at Cape Town Stadium, before kicking a football around with some children.

Obama told the children they needed to make smart choices and take care of their health if they want to be productive individuals.

Archbishop Tutu told the children Obama's presence was proof the possibilities for their futures are endless.

Last year, Obama helped launch a program in the United States called "Let's Move," to help fight the growing problem of childhood obesity.

Some information for this report was provided by AP.

XS
SM
MD
LG