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More Than 90 Killed in Norway's Twin Attacks


Rescue personnel push an injured victim away from the camp site in Utoeya, Norway, July 23, 2011

Rescue personnel push an injured victim away from the camp site in Utoeya, Norway, July 23, 2011

Norwegian police are questioning the suspected gunman who shot and killed at least 85 people at a youth summer camp hours after he set off a bomb blast that killed seven people in the capital, Oslo.

Police announced the updated death toll Saturday from the most violent events Norway has witnessed since World War II.

Footage of youth summer camp, Oslo bombing, and Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg

The gunman, dressed as a police officer, opened fire at a camp for the youth wing of Norway's ruling Labor Party Friday on an island about 30 kilometers north of Oslo. Most of his victims were teenagers. Authorities are searching the surrounding lake for more bodies.

Police say the man also carried out the Friday bombing that targeted government headquarters in Oslo.

Norway's justice minister Knut Storberget says the suspect in custody is a 32-year-old Norwegian man. The media have identified him as Anders Behring Breivik.

Norway's Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg said Saturday the "brutal" attack on "innocent youths" would not take away Norwegians' feeling of safety. He said safety was a pillar of society that Norwegians had taken for granted, and he stressed that the main focus is on saving the lives of those hurt in the attacks.

Authorities have not determined a motive for the attacks.

Eskil Pedersen, a leader of the Labor Party youth wing and a survivor of the attack, said the group "will not let the terrorist win." He said the group will continue to work hard for the party in honor of those who were killed.

The building that was bombed in Oslo houses the office of the prime minister. He was not there at the time and was not harmed.

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U.S. President Barack Obama condemned the attacks and expressed his condolences for the loss of life.

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton added that the United States is ready to support Norway as it seeks to bring those responsible to justice.

U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, through his spokesman, said he was shocked by the attacks and said the United Nations stands with the people of Norway "at this terrible moment."

Some information for this report was provided by AP and Reuters.

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