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Myanmar Military Vows to Uphold Democratic Transition

  • Fern Robinson

Commander-in-chief Min Aung Hlaing rides on a vehicle during a parade to mark Armed Forces Day in Myanmar's capital Naypyitaw, March 27, 2016.

Commander-in-chief Min Aung Hlaing rides on a vehicle during a parade to mark Armed Forces Day in Myanmar's capital Naypyitaw, March 27, 2016.

Myanmar's powerful military chief vowed to keep the country and its citizens on the road to "prosperity" and warned about the challenges the nation could face as it becomes a democracy.

Speaking Sunday at the annual Armed Forces Day parade in the capital, Naypyidaw, Senior General Min Aung Hlaing said, "I would solemnly impart the fact that the Tatmadaw (army) will cooperate to bring about the prosperity of the Union and its citizens."

The general also said,"The two main hindrances to democratization are not abiding by the rule of law and the presence of armed insurgencies. These could lead to a chaotic democracy."

Hlaing's remarks came just days before Aung San Suu Kyi's National League for Democracy party takes office after years of military rule in Myanmar, also known as Burma.

Nobel laureate Suu Kyi is barred from becoming president due to a provision in the constitution prohibiting anyone with a foreign-born spouse or children. Her late husband and two sons are British.

She has vowed to rule through her proxy and longtime confidant, President-elect Htin Kyaw who takes office on April 1, ending more than 50 years of complete or partial military rule.

The National League for Democracy took both chambers of parliament in November's historic elections.

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