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North Korea Bans South Korean Snacks at Kaesong Complex


FILE - A South Korean vendor, his car filled with Choco Pie snacks and instant noodles, prepares to leave for the Kaesong Industrial Complex just north of the demilitarized zone separating the two Koreas, Sept. 16, 2013.

FILE - A South Korean vendor, his car filled with Choco Pie snacks and instant noodles, prepares to leave for the Kaesong Industrial Complex just north of the demilitarized zone separating the two Koreas, Sept. 16, 2013.

North Korea has asked South Korean businesses at the Kaesong industrial complex to replace all foodstuffs given to its workers at the inter-Korean park with North Korea-made products.

A representative of the South Korean businesses, who visited the complex Tuesday, told VOA's Korean Service that South Korean companies began distributing North Korean substitutes for popular South Korean food supplies to the North Korean workers as early as March. Almost all South Korea-made food products have now been replaced with North Korean products.

Choco Pie, a popular South Korean snack cake, also has been replaced with a similar North Korea-made sweet. The chocolate covered cake with marshmallow filling has become one of the most popular items in the North’s black markets. Other North Korea-made foodstuffs given to the workers include instant noodles with chicken broth and condiments.

In an attempt to keep South Korean foodstuffs from the complex, the North is imposing an additional business tax on the companies for bringing in South Korea-made products. About 50 South Korean businesses supplying food for the complex face bankruptcy, according to representatives of the South Korean businesses.

Some business owners have expressed concern about the quality of North Korean foodstuffs. One representative said some workers are suffering from food poisoning after the switch.

A South Korean official who asked to remain anonymous told VOA the North Korean move is aimed at blocking the flow of South Korean products into the North and earning foreign currency.

South Korean companies have been providing about $60 per month in snacks to each North Korean worker. With approximately 53,000 workers at the complex, Pyongyang can now garner up to $3 million every month from the snack sales.

The Kaesong industrial complex is located just north of the demilitarized zone that divides the peninsula. Through the joint project, South Korean companies can employ a cheap labor force that can speak Korean, albeit in a slightly different dialect, and North Korea can gain the much needed foreign currency.

Jee Abbey Lee contributed to this report.

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