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Obama Tries To Rally Democrats In Final Days Before Election

  • Kent Klein

With two days left before the crucial midterm election, President Barack Obama makes a final get-out-the-vote push for Democratic candidates in Bridgeport, Conn., Saturday, Oct. 30, 2010.

With two days left before the crucial midterm election, President Barack Obama makes a final get-out-the-vote push for Democratic candidates in Bridgeport, Conn., Saturday, Oct. 30, 2010.

In the final days before Tuesday's (Nov. 2) congressional elections, President Barack Obama is making one last campaign swing, in hopes of persuading more of his fellow Democrats to vote.

With public opinion polls predicting big losses for his Democratic Party, President Obama is on the road once more, trying to limit the damage.

Young voters were a big part of Mr. Obama's surge to the presidency in 2008, so he went to a university in Philadelphia on Saturday and urged students to campaign for Democratic candidates. "Coming to a rally, that is not the hard part. What I need this weekend is 20,000 doors knocked on by all the volunteers who are here today," he said.

Public opinion surveys predict that Republicans will easily win at least the 39 seats they need to take control of the House of Representatives, and probably more. There is a lesser chance that Republicans could also take over the Senate.

Polls also say Republicans are showing much more enthusiasm for voting this year than Democrats, and especially young Democrats.

The president called on the students in Philadelphia to prevent his administration's achievements from being reversed. "It is difficult here in Pennsylvania. It is difficult all across the country, and unless each and every one of you turn out and get your friends to turn out and get your families to turn out, then we could fall short. And all the progress that we have made over the last couple of years can be rolled back," he said.

Later, in the Northeastern city of Bridgeport, Connecticut, Mr. Obama confronted hecklers demanding more action on AIDS research. "You have been appearing at every rally we have been doing, and we are funding global AIDS and the other side is not, so I do not know why you think this is a useful strategy to take," he said.

Republicans are also spending the weekend campaigning for their candidates.

The top Republican in the House of Representatives, Minority Leader John Boehner, would likely become House Speaker if his party wins at least 39 seats on Tuesday. He urged Republicans in his home state of Ohio to help him reverse Democratic programs he says cost too much. "All of you in this crowd know that if we do not turn this country around, the future for our kids and grandkids is not going to be as bright. We have got to bring hope back to America. And the way to do that is to fight for a smaller, less costly and more accountable government in Washington, D.C.," he said.

President Obama goes to Ohio Sunday, for his last campaign stop of the year. Mr. Obama won Ohio in 2008, but the state appears to be favoring Republican candidates this year.

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