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Research Company Denies Bias in Ghanaian Poll

  • Peter Clottey

Ghana's President John Atta Mills (front,C) arrives for the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) meeting in Nigeria's capital Abuja, December 7, 2010 (file photo).

Ghana's President John Atta Mills (front,C) arrives for the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) meeting in Nigeria's capital Abuja, December 7, 2010 (file photo).

The global research company Synovate has denied accusations its latest poll was politically motivated to weaken Ghana’s ruling National Democratic Congress [NDC], ahead of next year’s general elections.

Synovate’s senior research manager Willy Mensah says his company’s research was, in his words, scientifically-based and devoid of any political bias.

“This [poll] is just to air the voice of the Ghanaian. There is no political motivation behind this,” said Mensah.

The Synovate poll suggests incumbent President John Atta-Mills will fail in his bid to be re-elected, if the elections were held now.

Critics say the poll was skewed in favor of the main opposition New Patriotic Party [NPP.] The survey comes amidst reported cracks within the rank and file of the ruling NDC.

Mensah insists Synovate will not compromise its “credible” standards.

“We are a global agency [and] and our reputation is at stake. Why would we align ourselves with any political party?” Mensah asked.

In its latest poll of likely registered voters, Nana Akufo-Addo, presidential candidate for the opposition NPP, garnered 43 percent, while President John Atta-Mills received 38 percent.

NPP supporters say the poll shows Ghanaians want their party to return to power after it lost the presidency to the NDC in the last general elections. Ruling party supporters disagree, saying President Atta-Mills’ leadership continues to enjoy the confidence of Ghanaians.

Mensah says the parties should see the poll as a useful resource.

“If any of these political parties will go by it [poll], they should rather look at it and see where they need to do a bit of work for them to come out victorious in the next elections,” said Mensah.

According to Synovate, six percent of the 2000 people sampled in the survey said they would not vote.

One percent said their vote is secret and another one percent said they didn’t know who they would vote for if elections were held today.

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