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Woolwich Suspect Tells Court He's 'Ashamed to Be British'

  • Reuters

FILE - Military boots are displayed outside London's Woolwich Barracks in tribute to British soldier Lee Rigby killed nearby in May.

FILE - Military boots are displayed outside London's Woolwich Barracks in tribute to British soldier Lee Rigby killed nearby in May.

One of two men accused of hacking to death a soldier on a London street told police he was ashamed to be British, a court heard on Wednesday.

Michael Adebolajo, 28, and Michael Adebowale, 22, are accused of running over Drummer Lee Rigby, 25, as he crossed a street in Woolwich, southeast London, in May before attacking his unconscious body with a meat cleaver and knives.

The prosecution has said the two suspects dragged Rigby's body into the middle of the road so as many people as possible could see the attack.

On Wednesday, the Old Bailey jury saw a video interview recorded a month after the attack in which Adebolajo, wearing a blue blanket over his head and upper body, told police that wars in Muslim countries had soured his feelings toward his country of birth.

“My shame with being called British begins when that title British is associated with the murder, pillaging and rape of innocent people. It disgusts me to the core,” London-born Adebolajo said in the interview.

“It brings me little joy to approach anybody and slay them,” Adebolajo added.

In this CCTV image released by the London Metropolitan Police, showing Lee Rigby of the Royal Regiment of Fusiliers (L), in this photo dated May 22, 2013, at Woolwich DLR rail station in London.

In this CCTV image released by the London Metropolitan Police, showing Lee Rigby of the Royal Regiment of Fusiliers (L), in this photo dated May 22, 2013, at Woolwich DLR rail station in London.

Both defendants, who deny murder, sat silently in the dock as the video was played of Adebolajo, who has asked the court to be referred to as Mujahid Abu Hamza.

The jury also heard that Adebolajo had “no signs of mental disorder” in written evidence read by the prosecutor from consultant forensic psychiatrist Tim McInerney.

Pathologist Simon Poole told the jury who said he found fractures to the left side of Rigby's back and ribs. The jury also was told that Rigby suffered a minimum of 14 injuries to his head and neck that damaged the underlying bone or cartilage.

One juror was in tears and at least two others visibly upset as the 12-member panel was shown computer-generated images of Rigby's injuries. The trial is expected to last another two weeks.
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