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Scan Reveals Likely Hidden Rooms in King Tut's Tomb

  • VOA News

Egypt's Antiquities Minister Mamdouh el-Damaty, left, speaks during a press conference as he displays images of radar scans to King Tut's burial chamber on a projector, at the Antiquities Ministry in Cairo, Egypt, March 17, 2016. El-Damaty says analysis of scans of famed King Tut's burial chamber has revealed two hidden rooms that could contain metal or organic material.

Egypt's Antiquities Minister Mamdouh el-Damaty, left, speaks during a press conference as he displays images of radar scans to King Tut's burial chamber on a projector, at the Antiquities Ministry in Cairo, Egypt, March 17, 2016. El-Damaty says analysis of scans of famed King Tut's burial chamber has revealed two hidden rooms that could contain metal or organic material.

Egypt's antiquities minister said Thursday that radar scans of famed King Tut's burial chamber showed the likely existence of two hidden rooms that could contain organic material and metal.

King Tut died in 1324 B.C. and archaeologists drew worldwide attention when they found his tomb filled with stunning artifacts in 1922.

A British archaeologist believes an extra room in the tomb contains the remains of Queen Nefertiti, the wife of King Tut's father.

Antiquities Minister Mamdouh el-Damaty said there is a 90 percent chance the scans located new chambers. As for Nefertiti, he believes the tomb could be holding a female from the family, but not her.

Additional scanning of the tomb area is planned for the end of this month.

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