Accessibility links

Search for Missing Malaysia Jet Goes Global

  • George Putic

A Vietnamese officer prepares a flight route on a TV screen during a news conference about their mission to find missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 at Phu Quoc Airport on Phu Quoc Island, March 11, 2014.

A Vietnamese officer prepares a flight route on a TV screen during a news conference about their mission to find missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 at Phu Quoc Airport on Phu Quoc Island, March 11, 2014.

A Colorado-based satellite imaging company, DigitalGlobe, says it has activated its Internet platform called Tomnod, making it available to everyone with a computer and Internet connection to help search for the missing Malaysia plane.

The company says in response to an unprecedented level of traffic it plans to publish a new collection of images of the area where the plane went missing.

DigitalGlobe appeals to all who can donate their time to scan the detailed images of the ocean surface for possible clues.

Expanded search areas in Strait of Malacca

Expanded search areas in Strait of Malacca

Last Sunday, two of the DigitalGlobe’s satellites captured images of about 3,200 square kilometers of the Gulf of Thailand, with resolution of about 20 meters to a centimeter of the regular computer screen. The images are available on its platform tomnod.com.

The site requires a free subscription which allows the user to tag the area already searched, clearly mark the spotted objects and share the tags with other users.

DigitalGlobe has participated in search and recovery efforts during several natural and man-made disasters, most notably last year, when typhoon Haiyan devastated parts of the Philippines.

The privately-owned company operates five satellites and caters to a large number of government and private customers, including NASA and Google.

Show comments

XS
SM
MD
LG