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Search Resumes for Missing Malaysian Jetliner

  • VOA News

Staff at satellite communications company Inmarsat work in front of a screen at their headquarters in London March 25, 2014.

Staff at satellite communications company Inmarsat work in front of a screen at their headquarters in London March 25, 2014.

Aircraft from Australia, the United States, China, Japan, New Zealand and South Korea have resumed the search for wreckage from Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 in remote waters of the Indian Ocean.

Gale-force winds that caused a delay on Tuesday have died down, allowing 12 planes and two ships to scour the seas about 2,500 kilometers southwest of Perth in the hunt for potential debris.

The Australian Maritime Safety Authority, which coordinates the search on Malaysia's behalf, said Wednesday's search will focus on 80,000 square kilometers.

Meanwhile, China has demanded that Malaysia turn over the satellite data used to conclude that the jetliner had crashed, killing all 239 on board.

Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak said Monday that an analysis of satellite data received after the flight left Kuala Lumpur for Beijing on March 8 indicated the plane had gone down in the Indian Ocean.

But that did not satisfy China, home to 153 of the passengers. China's Deputy Foreign Minister Xie Hangsheng told Malaysia's ambassador that China wanted to know exactly what led Razak to announce that the plane had been lost.

On Tuesday, angry relatives of the passengers on board the missing Malaysian jetliner protested in front of the Malaysian embassy in Beijing.

Around 100 Chinese family members held signs and demanded to know the "truth" about the plane even as Malaysia Airlines began making initial $5,000 payments to relatives of those aboard.

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