Accessibility links

USA

Bomb Threats Evacuate White House Briefing Room, Senate Hearing

  • Aru Pande
  • Cindy Saine

Members of the media, and others, are evacuated from the White House in Washington, June 9, 2015.

Members of the media, and others, are evacuated from the White House in Washington, June 9, 2015.

Agents from the United States Secret Service cleared reporters from the White House briefing room Tuesday afternoon following a bomb threat.

A " telephonic bomb threat concerning the White House Briefing Room was called into the Metropolitan Police Department shortly before 2:00 p.m.," Secret Service spokesman Brian Leary said in a statement.

The White House and the Dirksen Senate Office Building in, Washington, DC

The White House and the Dirksen Senate Office Building in, Washington, DC

The room was evacuated during a briefing with White House spokesman Josh Earnest.

The evacuation was limited to the White House Press Briefing Room and did not affect any other sections of the White House.

A Secret Service sniffer dog was deployed to check out the area.

After being evacuated, reporters headed to what is known as Pebble Beach where the television networks have their live positions, then were moved to the South Court Auditorium in the nearby Eisenhower Executive Office Building. Press held there for about 25 minutes before given the all clear to return to the briefing.

The briefing with Earnest resumed around 2:45 p.m. He attempted to get back to the cybersecurity question he was in the middle of answering prior to the evacuation but instead, was greeted by a volley of questions.

The president and the first family were not evacuated, Earnest told reporters, adding Obama was on the White House grounds at the time.

WATCH: Video clip of moments before and after evacuation

This was the first evacuation during a televised press briefing, although the White House has seen various security breaches including a man who jumped the fence last year.

Earlier, a hearing of the Transportation Security Agency (TSA) on Capitol Hill was evacuated over a bomb threat.

Capitol police cleared several floors at the Dirksen Senate office building but found no hazardous materials.

Lawmakers were questioning TSA and Homeland Security officials following recent troubles at the TSA.

Asked whether the two threats were related, Earnest referred reporters to the Secret Service.

XS
SM
MD
LG