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Last Survivor of Enola Gay Crew Dies

  • VOA News

FILE -- In this undated handout picture from the U.S.Army Air Force, the ground crew of the Enola Gay B29 bomber, which bombed Hiroshima, Japan on Aug. 6, 1945 with the "Little Boy" atomic bomb.

FILE -- In this undated handout picture from the U.S.Army Air Force, the ground crew of the Enola Gay B29 bomber, which bombed Hiroshima, Japan on Aug. 6, 1945 with the "Little Boy" atomic bomb.

The last surviving crewmember of the Enola Gay — the plane that dropped the first atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, at the end of World War II — has died.

Theodore "Dutch" Van Kirk, navigator on the B29 Superfortress that dropped the first atom bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, talks about the flight of the Enola Gay at his home in Stone Mountain, Georgia, July 18, 2005.

Theodore "Dutch" Van Kirk, navigator on the B29 Superfortress that dropped the first atom bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, talks about the flight of the Enola Gay at his home in Stone Mountain, Georgia, July 18, 2005.

Theodore Van Kirk was 93 years old and living in a retirement home in Stone Mountain, Georgia, outside Atlanta.

Van Kirk was the navigator of the B-29 that dropped the bomb nicknamed "Little Boy" on Hiroshima on August 6, 1945. The blast killed as many as 140,000 people.

A second attack, on Nagasaki three days later, killed another 80,000. The bombings led Japan to accept the allied demand for unconditional surrender, ending World War II.

In an interview with the Associated Press in 2005, Van Kirk said wars and atomic bombs settle nothing and that he wanted to see the weapons banned.

Some information for this report comes from AP.

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