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Australia: MH370 Didn't Crash Near Where Pings Were Heard

  • VOA News

FILE - The United States said last weekend that it would only contribute its sophisticated Bluefin-21 underwater drone for one more month in the search for missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370.

FILE - The United States said last weekend that it would only contribute its sophisticated Bluefin-21 underwater drone for one more month in the search for missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370.

Location of detected pings, Malaysian Airlines MH 370.

Location of detected pings, Malaysian Airlines MH 370.

Australian authorities have concluded the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 did not crash in the area of the southern Indian Ocean where electronic signals were detected last month.

The estimation was made Thursday following the final mission of a miniature, unmanned submarine that was scanning the ocean floor off the southwest coast of Australia.

In a statement, the Joint Agency Coordination Center said the Bluefin-21 submarine found no signs of aircraft debris during its search of 850 square kilometers of ocean floor.

​It said the Australian Transport Safety Board has made a professional judgment that the area "can now be discounted as the final resting place" of the Malaysia Airlines flight.
Flight MH370 Timeline
  • Mar. 8: Contact lost less than one hour after departing Kuala Lumpur for Beijing
  • Mar. 10: Search radius expanded, China urges Malaysia to speed up investigation
  • Mar. 12: Chinese satellite images of possible debris are released and determined not to be related to the plane
  • Mar. 14: Media reports say MH370 communications system continued to ping a satellite hours after plane disappeared
  • Mar. 15: Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak says someone on MH370 likely turned off its communications systems
  • Mar. 20: Australian aircraft investigate possible debris in remote area of southern Indian Ocean
    Mar. 24: Razak says new analysis indicates MH370 crashed in Indian Ocean
  • Mar. 28: Search shifts more than 1,000 kilometers northeast in Indian Ocean following new "credible lead"
  • April 1: Malaysia releases full transcript of last exchanges with MH370
  • April 2: Malaysia says all flight MH370 passengers have been cleared of wrongdoing
  • April 4-6: Chinese and Australian ships report hearing signals in different parts of search area
  • April 14: Australia deploys mini-sub to aid search
  • May 1: Malaysia report says it took 17 minutes to realize MH370 had gone off radar
  • May 27: Malaysia releases raw satellite data used to calculate search area
  • May 29: Australia concludes plane did not crash near where pings were heard
The Boeing 777 was carrying 239 people when it disappeared from radar without a distress call on March 8, about a half hour after departing Kuala Lumpur for Beijing.

The news comes a day after a U.S. Navy official cast doubt on whether the electronic signals that led searchers to deploy the robotic submarine really emanated from the missing plane.

Navy deputy director of ocean engineering Michael Dean told CNN authorities almost universally believe the so-called "pings" did not come from the plane's black box or cockpit voice recorders, as initially thought.

Dean said the signals probably came from another man-made source, such as a nearby ship or from within the electronics of the towed pinger locator that was searching for the signals.

A Navy spokesman, Chris Johnson, dismissed Dean's remarks as "speculative and premature." In an e-mail, he said the U.S. and others continue to work to "more thoroughly understand the data."

Authorities used a series of transmissions between the plane and a communications satellite to determine that the jet crashed in the remote part of the Indian Ocean.

There, a U.S. Navy pinger locator towed by an Australian ship detected a series of signals believed to come from the plane's black box. But an extensive search of the ocean floor failed to produce any trace of the jet.

Malaysian authorities, along with the British company Inmarsat, this week released the raw satellite data used to narrow the search. Many family members of those missing hope independent analysis of the data can provide more clues about the plane's location.

Satellite data is not normally used to determine a missing plane’s location, but investigators had little other choice because the plane's communications devices were either disabled or malfunctioned during the flight.

Malaysian authorities believe someone with an in-depth knowledge of airplane systems intentionally diverted the jet, but an investigation of the pilots and passengers has not yielded any solid leads.

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