Accessibility links

USA

US Remembers Japanese Attack on Pearl Harbor

  • VOA News

This Nov. 21, 2014 photo shows visitors looking out at the sunken USS Arizona from a memorial atop the rusting battleship in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.

This Nov. 21, 2014 photo shows visitors looking out at the sunken USS Arizona from a memorial atop the rusting battleship in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.

Sunday is the 73rd anniversary of the sneak Japanese attack on the U.S. Navy base at Pearl Harbor in Hawaii, but the day now is marked with little fanfare.

In 1941, U.S. President Franklin Roosevelt declared the December 7 attack as "a date which will live in infamy," with the U.S. declaring war on Japan a day later and entering World War II. More than 2,400 American sailors and others were killed in the attack on what is now a U.S. island state in the middle of the Pacific Ocean.

FILE - In this file image provided by the U.S. Navy, crewmen of the USS Nevada still fight flames on the battleship, battered in the Japanese aerial attack on Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941.

FILE - In this file image provided by the U.S. Navy, crewmen of the USS Nevada still fight flames on the battleship, battered in the Japanese aerial attack on Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941.

President Barack Obama issued a proclamation declaring Sunday as National Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day, recalling that the Greatest Generation sent millions of Americans into war "to make the world safer, freer, and more just."

But he did not plan to attend any ceremonies commemorating the day. A wreath is being laid at Pearl Harbor, with survivors recalling the Sunday morning attack.

Now, Japan is a staunch U.S. ally and there are a fast-dwindling number of aging American veterans who fought in World War Two, just one million of the 16 million who served.

Show comments

XS
SM
MD
LG