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Meet the Women Who Support Donald Trump


FILE - A group of women hold signs and shout their support as they wait on line to attend a Republican presidential candidate, Donald Trump campaign rally, in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, April 25, 2016.

FILE - A group of women hold signs and shout their support as they wait on line to attend a Republican presidential candidate, Donald Trump campaign rally, in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, April 25, 2016.

They've been told they're a disgrace to their gender. In some cases, they've been denied jobs. They've been on the receiving end of repeated profanity-filled tirades.

That's just a sampling of the kind of treatment you get if you're a woman who supports Donald Trump, according to a group of female supporters who've formed a Super PAC to help the presumptive Republican presidential nominee.

The group, Women Vote Trump, aims to raise tens of millions of dollars. It's also trying to change the public perception that women don't support the bombastic billionaire, who has a long record of making insulting and objectifying comments about women.

"There are women across the country who are afraid to come out" and publicly back Trump, says Kathryn Serkes, a co-chair of the group. "We are providing a home for women who support him."

Social media personalities Lynette Hardaway, left, and Rochelle Richardson, right, known collectively as "Diamond and Silk," pose with actress Stacey Dash at the unveiling of the Women Vote Trump Super PAC in Washington, D.C., June 9, 2016. (W. Gallo/VOA)

Social media personalities Lynette Hardaway, left, and Rochelle Richardson, right, known collectively as "Diamond and Silk," pose with actress Stacey Dash at the unveiling of the Women Vote Trump Super PAC in Washington, D.C., June 9, 2016. (W. Gallo/VOA)

At the group's unveiling, none of the female organizers said they were offended by Trump's past use of phrases such as "bimbo," dog" and "fat pig" to describe women.

"Words don't offend me," said actress and conservative activist Stacey Dash. "And even if he said things, he's a New Yorker. He's street."

Verbal abuse

Dash was one of several women at the event who said they have experienced some form of ridicule or verbal abuse as a result of their public support of Trump.

"I've been ostracized," Dash said. "I've had agents drop me. I've not gotten jobs because of my political beliefs."

Dash said she received similar backlash when she voted for Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney in 2012.

"Because I'm black I was supposed to vote for the black guy. I'm done with that. We're all done with that," she said.

Amy Kremer, a Women Vote Trump co-chair, says she initially kept her Trump support secret because she was afraid of "being reprimanded or called not a true conservative."

Once she did go public, the response was brutal. Following a recent appearance on CNN, her inbox filled with insulting comments, including one person who called her a "pathetic, ... moron" and a "disgrace to your gender."

From left, social media personality Lynette Hardaway, actress Stacey Dash, social media personality Rochelle Richardson, and Republican political activist Ann Stone at the unveiling of the Women Vote Trump Super PAC in Washington, D.C., June 9, 2016. (W. Gallo/VOA)

From left, social media personality Lynette Hardaway, actress Stacey Dash, social media personality Rochelle Richardson, and Republican political activist Ann Stone at the unveiling of the Women Vote Trump Super PAC in Washington, D.C., June 9, 2016. (W. Gallo/VOA)

"I went back to my room and I just cried. It was the first time I cried," said Kremer, who was one of the founding leaders of the conservative Tea Party movement. "No one likes to be called names."

But is Kremer offended at some of the names Trump has used for women?

"Some women may find it insulting," she conceded. "But I'm not concerned by what someone did 20, 30 years ago."

Trump's woman problem

The group faces an uphill battle to convince women to get behind Trump.

A Gallup poll last month found seven in 10 women have an unfavorable opinion of Trump. An NBC poll showed women support Trump's likely general election rival, ex-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, by a 23-point margin.

The task may be further complicated by the fact that Clinton is the first female presidential candidate to secure a major party's nomination.

But any notion that Trump faces a "woman problem" is a myth," says Serkes. "We know Donald Trump isn't perfect. But he is genuine. And that is a breath of fresh air."

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