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World Leaders React to Mubarak Resignation

  • Henry Ridgwell

Egyptians celebrate the news of the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak, who handed control of the country to the military, Cairo, Egypt, February 11, 2011

Egyptians celebrate the news of the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak, who handed control of the country to the military, Cairo, Egypt, February 11, 2011

With the resignation of Hosni Mubarak as president of Egypt and the transition of presidential powers to the military, leaders across Europe have called for a quick transition from military to democratic rule. And in cities across the Middle East, celebrations erupted in support of Egypt's anti-government protests that brought down the man who had ruled Egypt for three decades.

As the protesters who had been calling for Mubarak to resign celebrated their victory in Cairo’s Tahrir Square, leaders across the world marked this milestone in Middle East history.

Since the protests began late last month, Western leaders had walked a tightrope, calling for democratic reform, but stopping short of openly calling for Mubarak, a long-time ally in the region, to resign.

Barely an hour after the announcement of Mubarak's resignation, British Prime Minister David Cameron had this message for Egypt’s new rulers. "We believe it must be a government that starts to put in place the building blocks of a truly open, free and democratic society."

The call for a quick transition from military to democratic rule was echoed across the capitals of Europe.

The European Union’s foreign affairs chief, Catherine Ashton, said Europe stands with the people. "To say to those who are now charged with being the guardians of the transitional period that we have high expectations that they will deliver for the people, and that the European Union will be there to offer its support."

German Chancellor Angela Merkel urged Egypt to honor its international obligations. She said that by resigning, Mubarak "did one last service to the people of Egypt." She expressed hope that future Egyptian governments would continue with peace in the Middle East and honor the treaties with Israel, saying the safety of Israel must be guaranteed.

From the United Nations in New York, United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-moon hailed the patience of the protesters. "The voice of the Egyptian people, particularly the youth, has been heard and it is for them to determine the future of their country."

Watch Henry Ridgwell's video report

In Tunisia, where a wave of unrest just a few weeks ago forced the collapse of that country's government and inspired Egyptians and others, few could believe the chain of events that has since swept through the region.

Tunis resident Safia Ruwees summed up the mood. He said he wanted to congratulate the Egyptian people and all Arabs. He said, "These are democracies that we are bringing with our hands, no one has brought them to us, not America, not France, no one."

Across the Middle East, people are taking to the streets in solidarity with the Egyptian protesters.

In Jordan, which has witnessed its own anti-government protests on a smaller scale, Egyptian flags filled the night sky.

It was the same story in Gaza where the roads filled with people celebrating. Hamas, which controls the Gaza strip, offered its support through spokesman Sami Abu Zuhri.

Zuhri said the resignation announcement in Egypt was the start of "victory of the Egyptian revolution," and that Hamas supported the demands of the Egyptian people.

And in Beirut, there were more fireworks and more celebrations. Egyptian expatriate Issam Allawi gave his view. "We are very happy today that we were able to overcome the dictator Hosni Mubarak," he said. Tomorrow, he said, "the next dictators throughout the entire Arab world."

That final sentiment likely will be on the minds of many world leaders. While they praise Egypt’s show of people power, governments across the Arab world and beyond are wondering where might be next.

View the slide show of reaction and protests in Egypt

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