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Yemeni Children, Disabled at Risk

After a center for the blind was hit by Saudi-led airstrikes in Yemen, Human Rights Watch says Houthi militants are partially to blame for using civilian sites for military purposes.
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A blind child carries a dove at a protest against the attack on the al-Nour Center for the Blind in Sana'a, Yemen, Jan. 10, 2016. Students say neither the school, nor themselves, have taken any side in the war. (A. Mojalli/VOA)
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A blind child carries a dove at a protest against the attack on the al-Nour Center for the Blind in Sana'a, Yemen, Jan. 10, 2016. Students say neither the school, nor themselves, have taken any side in the war. (A. Mojalli/VOA)

Five people were injured in the airstrike in January 2016 at the center in Sana'a, Yemen, and Human Rights Watch says the bomb didn’t explode, preventing a greater tragedy. (A. Mojalli/VOA)
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Five people were injured in the airstrike in January 2016 at the center in Sana'a, Yemen, and Human Rights Watch says the bomb didn’t explode, preventing a greater tragedy. (A. Mojalli/VOA)

Human Rights Watch says nearly 6,000 people have been disabled since the Saudi-led coalition began airstrikes nine months ago. (A. Mojalli/VOA)
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Human Rights Watch says nearly 6,000 people have been disabled since the Saudi-led coalition began airstrikes nine months ago. (A. Mojalli/VOA)

The al-Nour center is Sana’a’s only school for the blind, serving roughly 250 people and housing more than 100. (A. Mojalli/VOA)
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The al-Nour center is Sana’a’s only school for the blind, serving roughly 250 people and housing more than 100. (A. Mojalli/VOA)

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