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Join host Rick Pantaleo to examine global issues in science, technology, health, agriculture, and the environment on Science World.

July 2013

July 27, 2013

July 27, 2013 - Mars Once Had an Oxygen Rich Atmosphere

NASA recently unveiled the first images from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph study of the sun. Suzanne Presto will tell us more...  We hear about new research that predicts that if large amounts of methane are released from thawing permafrost in the Arctic... the world could wind-up paying out an incredible amount of money. And the UK's Oxford University reports findings that Mars may have had an oxygen-rich atmosphere nearly 1.5 billion years before Earth.  We talk with one of the scientists who led the research. This and more are coming up for you on VOA's science, health and technology magazine, "Science World."


July 22, 2013

Science World - Mysterious Radio Bursts from Deep Space - July 20, 2013

We'll hear about two new studies about giant, plant-eating dinosaurs that roamed the Earth between 76 and 150 million years ago; Carol Pearson tells us about a new study that looked at people around the world to see if they followed their doctors' advice following a heart-attack; and four mysterious and powerful radio bursts that traveled half-way across the universe were detected by an international team of astronomers - we'll talk with one of the scientists behind the discovery.  This and more are coming up for you on VOA's science, health and technology magazine, "Science World."


July 13, 2013

Science World - Flame and Combustion in Space - NASA's FLEX-2 Project

Astronomers have gotten the first-ever peek at our solar system's tail, NASA's next Mars rover will be looking for signs of past life, and we'll hear how experiments with fire aboard the International Space Station are helping scientists develop more effective fire suppressants and get a better understanding of the combustion process.


July 06, 2013

Science World - The Best of Science World

When actor Alan Alda was 11 years old he found himself quite fascinated with the flame burning at the end of a candle.   Curious, he asked his teacher - 'what's a flame?'  Hoping for a clear and concise answer, the teacher instead came back at him with just a one word answer - oxidation.   Years later Mr. Alda decided to challenge scientists around the world to explain what a flame is in terms that an 11 year old could comprehend.   The challenge was called "the Flame Challenge," named after that elusive question asked so long ago. Years ago Leroy Hood along with his colleagues at the California Institute of Technology developed 4 instruments that helped pave the way for the successful mapping of the human genome. Dr. Hood's latest passion is in developing various strategies, technologies and knowledge that he thinks will lead to new methods of how the science of medicine is practiced.  He calls his new approach P4 Medicine which stands for predictive, personalized, preventive and participatory medicine. When Autar Kaw was a young man, attending college in his native India, like many college students, he didn't have much money, which meant that he had limited access to necessary but expensive textbooks.  Today, he is a mechanical engineering professor at the University of South Florida. But he never forgot the hardships that he faced during those early years at college.  To help engineering students with limited financial resources, Professor Kaw created a free, online collection of college courseware. Government agencies along with other organizations are to keeping an eye on threatening space objects such as asteroids.  The B612 foundation is a private non-governmental organization that was founded in 2001 by a group of notable scientists, including two former NASA astronauts. The foundation is working on a mission that they say will harness the power of science and technology to help protect our planet. Russell "Rusty" Schweickart, a former NASA astronaut, and one of the founders of this organization, talks about the threat of near earth objects and how the B612 foundation plans to help locate and protect Earth from these threats.

July 2013

Science World is VOA’s on-air and online blog covering science, health, technology and the environment.

Rick PantaleoHosted by Rick Pantaleo, Science World‘s informative, entertaining and easy-to-understand presentation offers the latest news, features and one-on-one interviews with researchers, scientists, innovators and other newsmakers.


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Science World begins after the newscast on Friday at 2200, Saturday at 0300, 1100 and 1900 and Sunday at 0100, 0400, 0900, 1100 and 1200. The program may also be heard on some VOA affiliates after the news on Saturday at 0900 and 1100. (All times UTC).
 

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Rolling Thunder Run Reveals Changed Attitudes Towards Vietnam Wari
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Katherine Gypson
May 25, 2015 1:32 AM
For many US war veterans, the Memorial Day holiday is an opportunity to look back at a divisive conflict in the nation’s history and to remember those who did not make it home.
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Video Rolling Thunder Run Reveals Changed Attitudes Towards Vietnam War

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