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Join host Rick Pantaleo to examine global issues in science, technology, health, agriculture, and the environment on Science World.

August 2013

August 31, 2013

August 31, 2013 - Giant Magellan Telescope

We’ll learn about the new Giant Magellan Telescope that's being built in Chile - a super telescope that will produce celestial images 10 times sharper than the Hubble. Also… •    Bird strikes are a hazard to aviation - most bird strikes go unreported, those that are, are investigated by a forensic team at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History •    If you're a Star Trek fan, surely you remember Mr. Spock's Vulcan mind-meld... this past week scientists were able to do a real person to person mind meld. •    Scientists have created clumps of tissue in test tubes that are strikingly similar to actual developing brains. •    Researchers have successfully crippled aggressive cancer cells by disabling a single protein.  This could lead to new treatments for some malignant cancers. •    Students heading back to school for a new year might need to add a new element to their periodic table of elements in chemistry class. 


August 24, 2013

August 25, 2013 - Distracted Driving

NASA introduced its newest 8 astronauts this week... and the space agency also announced that they are looking for some ideas of what to do with 3 historic launch platforms they no longer need. Scientists have developed a promising treatment for Ebola hemorrhagic fever, even following the onset of its severe symptoms. Scientists have come up with a new statistical tool that predicts the risk of arsenic contamination in Chinese Wells. Robo Sally is a remotely controlled humanoid robot that may one day help law enforcement officials and emergency technicians with their jobs. And speaking of robots today's Science World Quick Quiz is about the word robot. From some dirty prehistoric pots, researchers have found the earliest evidence so far of cooking with spices. And we'll examine the growing problem of distracted driving on today's One on One segment


August 17, 2013

August 17, 2013 - Research on How We Hear Could Lead to Help for the Hearing Impaired

Today we'll hear about the discovery of a new meat-eating animal. You've probably heard stories about people having near-death visions of light and tunnels.  Turns out that those visions just might be the way our brain responds to dying. And, did you know that we hear not only by sound entering our ears... but also from vibrations detected by our skulls?  A California scientist tells us about his research into how we hear and how much of what we hear is in our heads. This and more are coming up for you on VOA's science, health and technology magazine, "Science World."


August 10, 2013

August 10, 2013 - Food Allergies

Astronomers announced this past week that massive magnetic fields of the Sun are about to do a serious flip flop in polarity. Scientists in London recently cooked up a lab produced hamburger, something they described as the world's "most expensive burger" since it cost about $300,000 to produce. We talk with the Medical Director of the UCLA Food & Drug Allergy Care Center to learn about food allergies, a condition that for some people could be deadly.


August 03, 2013

August 3, 2013 - New Study Links Climate Change with Violence

New 3D printers are beginning to play a major role in developing new technologies - George Putich tells us how surgeons are now using them to help plan heart surgeries. Speaking of new technology we'll hear how US Law enforcement officials use powerful cameras to scan license plates and build databases on the movements of millions of Americans. And, we talk with a researcher whose team has just discovered a correlation between climate shifts and human behavior - the study reveals that these deviations tend to make people more violent. This and more are coming up for you on VOA's science, health and technology magazine, "Science World."

August 2013

Science World is VOA’s on-air and online blog covering science, health, technology and the environment.

Rick PantaleoHosted by Rick Pantaleo, Science World‘s informative, entertaining and easy-to-understand presentation offers the latest news, features and one-on-one interviews with researchers, scientists, innovators and other newsmakers.


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Science World begins after the newscast on Friday at 2200, Saturday at 0300, 1100 and 1900 and Sunday at 0100, 0400, 0900, 1100 and 1200. The program may also be heard on some VOA affiliates after the news on Saturday at 0900 and 1100. (All times UTC).
 

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Turkey's Main Opposition Party Hopes for Election Breakthroughi
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May 22, 2015 10:23 AM
Turkey’s main opposition Republican People’s Party has sought an image change ahead of the June 7 general election. The move comes after suffering successive defeats at the hands of the Islamist-rooted AK Party, which has portrayed it as hostile to religion. Dorian Jones reports from the western city of Izmir.
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Video Turkey's Main Opposition Party Hopes for Election Breakthrough

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