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Join host Rick Pantaleo to examine global issues in science, technology, health, agriculture, and the environment on Science World.

September 2013

September 28, 2013

Heart Health on World Heart Day - 9/29/2013

Sunday, September 29, is World Heart Day.  It's a special day set aside by global health officials to draw awareness to the world's two leading causes of death, cardiovascular disease and stroke.  The President of the American Heart Association joins us today to talk about heart disease and how we can keep ourselves heart healthy.   Also…   This week, astronomers announced that they have spotted an ultra-compact dwarf galaxy some 60 light years from Earth.   A race track became a classroom for some Maryland students as they learned about science and engineering from open top Indy race cars.   The rooftop of a hotel in Thailand has been turned into an unusual farm for freshwater algae. Proponents tout the algae as a superfood.   Scientists have moved a step closer toward developing a universal vaccine against seasonal influenza.   More than a year after a locust plague was declared in Madagascar, a control program finally is about to begin. 


September 21, 2013

September 21, 2013 - Voyager 1 Becomes First Human-made Object to Leave Solar System

Last week NASA announced an historic first.  A space probe it launched 36 years ago became the first ever human-made object to sail out of our solar system and into the space between the stars.  Today we talk with Dr. Edward Stone, a man who has played a very important role in the Voyager program since its inception. Also… This past Wednesday NASA launched a new private rocket from its Mid-Atlantic Spaceport that will bring supplies to the International Space Station.  Suzanne Presto fills us in with the details. 3D printers give consumers the chance to bring ideas sketched on paper turned into real physical objects in a matter of hours.  Elizabeth Lee will tell us more. Biofuels have become a very popular alternative to fossil based fuels. Jan Sluizer reports that there's a new and promising source for biodiesel fuel -- algae. And, Richard Paul has a story about a unique calling card the Voyager has strapped to its side. It's a golden record that contains a variety of music and sounds of Earth.  It was meant as a way to introduce our planet to any aliens that might come in contact with the Voyager.


September 14, 2013

September 13, 2013 - Arctic Ice Better than Last Year, But Ice Free Arctic Still Possible

Voyager 1, a NASA probe launched in the 1970's makes history as the first human-made object to leave the solar system. The U.S. technology giant Apple unveils two new iPhone models. The World Bank has released new reports outlining the health challenges facing six major regions.   Pumping underground water for thirsty cities and crops can pull in arsenic from nearby polluted water sources but a new study shows that the contamination moves much more slowly than previously feared.   Satellite technology has revealed that the drought-stricken Turkana region of northern Kenya lies atop two giant underground lakes, or aquifers.   And although the Arctic Sea Ice extent didn't melt as much as it last year experts say some day in this century, the Arctic sea will spend a summer completely ice-free.


September 07, 2013

September 7, 2013 - Hacking, Cybercrime and Keeping Yourself Safe Online

Bill Carey of the software company Siber Systems, creators of the internet password manager Roboform talks about computer hacking, how to protect yourself from cybercrime. Also… •  New research shows that humans and the potentially lethal disease tuberculosis have grown and evolved side-by-side.   •  NASA is sending a new probe to the moon.  It’s called the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer or LADEE. •  Japan's government says it will take the lead in trying to stem the leaks of highly radioactive water at the damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant.   •  Scientists in New Hampshire say they have found a link between anasteroid or comet impact and a global climate change event that took place nearly 13,000 years ago. •  As firefighters battle dozens of fires in the Western United States, a new study finds that more wildfires are expected in a wider range for a longer time in the future.

September 2013

Science World is VOA’s on-air and online blog covering science, health, technology and the environment.

Rick PantaleoHosted by Rick Pantaleo, Science World‘s informative, entertaining and easy-to-understand presentation offers the latest news, features and one-on-one interviews with researchers, scientists, innovators and other newsmakers.


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Science World begins after the newscast on Friday at 2200, Saturday at 0300, 1100 and 1900 and Sunday at 0100, 0400, 0900, 1100 and 1200. The program may also be heard on some VOA affiliates after the news on Saturday at 0900 and 1100. (All times UTC).
 

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