radio / Science World

Join host Rick Pantaleo to examine global issues in science, technology, health, agriculture, and the environment on Science World.

September 2013

September 28, 2013

Heart Health on World Heart Day - 9/29/2013

Sunday, September 29, is World Heart Day.  It's a special day set aside by global health officials to draw awareness to the world's two leading causes of death, cardiovascular disease and stroke.  The President of the American Heart Association joins us today to talk about heart disease and how we can keep ourselves heart healthy.   Also…   This week, astronomers announced that they have spotted an ultra-compact dwarf galaxy some 60 light years from Earth.   A race track became a classroom for some Maryland students as they learned about science and engineering from open top Indy race cars.   The rooftop of a hotel in Thailand has been turned into an unusual farm for freshwater algae. Proponents tout the algae as a superfood.   Scientists have moved a step closer toward developing a universal vaccine against seasonal influenza.   More than a year after a locust plague was declared in Madagascar, a control program finally is about to begin. 


September 21, 2013

September 21, 2013 - Voyager 1 Becomes First Human-made Object to Leave Solar System

Last week NASA announced an historic first.  A space probe it launched 36 years ago became the first ever human-made object to sail out of our solar system and into the space between the stars.  Today we talk with Dr. Edward Stone, a man who has played a very important role in the Voyager program since its inception. Also… This past Wednesday NASA launched a new private rocket from its Mid-Atlantic Spaceport that will bring supplies to the International Space Station.  Suzanne Presto fills us in with the details. 3D printers give consumers the chance to bring ideas sketched on paper turned into real physical objects in a matter of hours.  Elizabeth Lee will tell us more. Biofuels have become a very popular alternative to fossil based fuels. Jan Sluizer reports that there's a new and promising source for biodiesel fuel -- algae. And, Richard Paul has a story about a unique calling card the Voyager has strapped to its side. It's a golden record that contains a variety of music and sounds of Earth.  It was meant as a way to introduce our planet to any aliens that might come in contact with the Voyager.


September 14, 2013

September 13, 2013 - Arctic Ice Better than Last Year, But Ice Free Arctic Still Possible

Voyager 1, a NASA probe launched in the 1970's makes history as the first human-made object to leave the solar system. The U.S. technology giant Apple unveils two new iPhone models. The World Bank has released new reports outlining the health challenges facing six major regions.   Pumping underground water for thirsty cities and crops can pull in arsenic from nearby polluted water sources but a new study shows that the contamination moves much more slowly than previously feared.   Satellite technology has revealed that the drought-stricken Turkana region of northern Kenya lies atop two giant underground lakes, or aquifers.   And although the Arctic Sea Ice extent didn't melt as much as it last year experts say some day in this century, the Arctic sea will spend a summer completely ice-free.


September 07, 2013

September 7, 2013 - Hacking, Cybercrime and Keeping Yourself Safe Online

Bill Carey of the software company Siber Systems, creators of the internet password manager Roboform talks about computer hacking, how to protect yourself from cybercrime. Also… •  New research shows that humans and the potentially lethal disease tuberculosis have grown and evolved side-by-side.   •  NASA is sending a new probe to the moon.  It’s called the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer or LADEE. •  Japan's government says it will take the lead in trying to stem the leaks of highly radioactive water at the damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant.   •  Scientists in New Hampshire say they have found a link between anasteroid or comet impact and a global climate change event that took place nearly 13,000 years ago. •  As firefighters battle dozens of fires in the Western United States, a new study finds that more wildfires are expected in a wider range for a longer time in the future.

September 2013

Science World is VOA’s on-air and online blog covering science, health, technology and the environment.

Rick PantaleoHosted by Rick Pantaleo, Science World‘s informative, entertaining and easy-to-understand presentation offers the latest news, features and one-on-one interviews with researchers, scientists, innovators and other newsmakers.


Listen to a Recent Program

 | Windows Media | Podcasts

 

Broadcast Schedule

Science World begins after the newscast on Friday at 2200, Saturday at 0300, 1100 and 1900 and Sunday at 0100, 0400, 0900, 1100 and 1200. The program may also be heard on some VOA affiliates after the news on Saturday at 0900 and 1100. (All times UTC).
 

Contact Us:

E-Mail

science@voanews.com
 

Postal Mail
Science World
Voice of America
330 Independence Ave., SW
Washington, DC 20237
USA

Calendar

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Olympics Construction Scars Sacred Korean Mountaini
X
July 02, 2015 4:10 AM
Environmentalists in South Korea are protesting a Winter Olympics construction project to build a ski slope through a 500-year-old protected forest. Brian Padden reports that although there is strong national support for hosting the 2018 Pyeongchang Winter Olympics, there are growing public concerns over the costs and possible ecological damage at the revered mountain.
Video

Video Olympics Construction Scars Sacred Korean Mountain

Environmentalists in South Korea are protesting a Winter Olympics construction project to build a ski slope through a 500-year-old protected forest. Brian Padden reports that although there is strong national support for hosting the 2018 Pyeongchang Winter Olympics, there are growing public concerns over the costs and possible ecological damage at the revered mountain.
Video

Video Xenophobia Victims in South Africa Flee Violence, Then Return

Many Malawians fled South Africa early this year after xenophobic attacks on African immigrants. But many quickly found life was no better at home and have returned to South Africa – often illegally and without jobs, and facing the tough task of having to start over. Lameck Masina and Anita Powell file from Johannesburg.
Video

Video Family of American Marine Calls for Release From Iranian Prison

As the crowd of journalists covering the Iran talks swells, so too do the opportunities for media coverage.  Hoping to catch the attention of high-level diplomats, the family of American-Iranian marine Amir Hekmati is in Vienna, pleading for his release from an Iranian prison after nearly 4 years.  VOA’s Heather Murdock reports from Vienna.
Video

Video UK Holds Terror Drill as MPs Mull Tunisia Response

After pledging a tough response to last Friday’s terror attack in Tunisia, which came just days before the 10th anniversary of the bomb attacks on London’s transport network, British security services are shifting their focus to overseas counter-terror operations. VOA's Henry Ridgwell has more.
Video

Video Obama on Cuba: This is What Change Looks Like

President Barack Obama says the United States will soon reopen its embassy in Cuba for the first time since 1961, ending a half-century of isolation. VOA White House correspondent Luis Ramirez reports.
Video

Video Hate Groups Spread Influence Via Internet

Hate groups of various kinds are using the Internet for propaganda and recruitment, and a Jewish human rights organization that monitors these groups, the Simon Wiesenthal Center, says their influence is growing. The messages are different, but the calls to hatred or violence are similar. VOA's Mike O’Sullivan reports.
Video

Video US Silica Sand Mining Surge Worries Illinois Residents, Businesses

Increased domestic U.S. oil and gas production, thanks to advances known as “fracking,” has created a boom for other industries supporting that extraction. Demand for silica sand, used in fracking, could triple over the next five years. In the Midwest state of Illinois, people living near the mines are worried about how increased silica sand mining will affect their businesses and their health. VOA’s Kane Farabaugh has more in this first of a series of reports.
Video

Video Blind Somali Journalist Defies Odds in Mogadishu

Despite improving security in the last few years, Somalia remains one of the most dangerous countries to be a journalist – even more so for someone who cannot see. Abdulaziz Billow has the story of journalist Abdifatah Hassan Kalgacal, who has been reporting from the Somali capital for the last decade despite being blind.
Video

Video Texas Defies Same-Sex Marriage Ruling

Texas state officials have criticized the US Supreme Court decision giving same-sex couples the right to marry nationwide. The attorney general of Texas says last week's decision did not overrule constitutional "rights of religious liberty," and therefore officials performing wedding services can refuse to perform them for same-sex couples if it is against their religious beliefs. Zlatica Hoke reports on the controversy.
Video

Video Rabbi Hits Road to Heal Jewish-Muslim Relations in France

France is on high alert after last week's terrorist attack near the city Lyon, just six months after deadly Paris shootings. The attack have added new tensions to relations between French Jews and Muslims. France’s Jewish and Muslim communities also share a common heritage, though, and as far as one French rabbi is concerned, they are destined to be friends. From the Paris suburb of La Courneuve, Lisa Bryant reports about Rabbi Michel Serfaty and his friendship bus.
Video

Video Saudi Leaks Expose ‘Checkbook Diplomacy’ In Battle With Iran

Saudi Arabia’s willingness to wield its oil money on the global diplomatic stage appears to have been laid bare, after the website WikiLeaks published tens of thousands of leaked cables from Riyadh’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs. VOA's Henry Ridgwell reports.
Video

Video In Kenya, Police Said to Shoot First, Ask Questions Later

An organization that documents torture and extrajudicial killings says Kenyan police were responsible for 1,252 shooting deaths in five cities, including Nairobi, between 2009 and 2014, representing 67 percent of all gun deaths in the areas reviewed. Gabe Joselow has more from Nairobi.

VOA Blogs