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Join host Rick Pantaleo to examine global issues in science, technology, health, agriculture, and the environment on Science World.

February 2014

February 22, 2014

Americans Love Science but Need Help to Better Understand It

According to a new survey, Americans, like others in many parts of the world, have a true respect for science and scientists. But, unfortunately, Americans, again like others around the globe, can use some tutoring to better learn and understand science.  On today's One on One Segment we talk with the lead author of the section of a new report that examined the public perceptions of science and technology. Also... Today we’ll hear that a bacterium responsible for causing pimples has now been discovered in some grapevines. And, the scientists who made the discovery have named their finding after the late music legend Frank Zappa. Several Ethiopians now living abroad have accused their own government of hacking into their computers and monitoring their private communications. One of the people involved is suing the Ethiopian government over it. There are new concerns about public health in the Indian capital of New Delhi after levels of air pollution there have reached record levels this winter. A new leak of highly radioactive water has been discovered at Japan's tsunami-stricken Fukushima nuclear power plant, but officials there have assured the public that the problem poses no harm the ocean. A new study finds honeybees from colonies that are managed by beekeepers may be infecting their wild bumblebee cousins with disease.


February 15, 2014

The First African-Americans in the Space Program and NASA’s role in Civil Rights

Two of the biggest and most historic events to take place in the 20th Century were NASA’s Space Program and the Civil Rights movement. It just happens that the quests for both racial equality and landing a man on the moon also intersected with each other, with one helping the other accomplish its goals.  Today we talk with Richard Paul and Steven Moss, authors of “And We Could Not Fail: The First African-Americans in the Space Program and NASA’s role in Civil Rights.” It’s a forthcoming book that chronicles the integration of NASA and how the space agency’s hiring of the first African-American engineers in the 1960’s also boosted the fight for Civil rights in the United States. ---- Other stories we look at ---- Genetic researchers believe that they have finally solved the puzzle as to which group of people were the first to arrive and settle in America. ---- Landmines, hidden from sight, maim and kill and remain long after conflicts end. A man from Columbia may have come up with a unique way to let people know that landmines are nearby – it’s a landmine detector that’s built into the insoles of shoes. ---- Many fast moving animals use their tails to help them maintain balance while they run. A young South African scientist has successfully used that concept to stabilize a fast moving robotic vehicle. - Do you like to play the Flappy Bird game on your smartphone and want to know why it was recently pulled off the market? We’ll have a report that will explain why. ---- As polar temperatures keep the northern hemisphere in a deep freeze, a newly published study finds that all that cold air may actually be good for your health.


February 08, 2014

Study: Climate Change is Killing Magellanic Penguin Chicks

A recent study has revealed that climate change is killing penguin chicks from the world's largest colony of Magellanic penguins.  We'll talk with Dee Boersma, a professor of biology at the University of Washington who led this 27 year study on today's One on One segment. Also… A group of mayors from the world's largest cities met in South Africa this past week to discuss the impact of climate change. A new study has found that high blood pressure in people as young as 18 increases their risk for heart disease. Tech giant Microsoft has a new CEO. This past week Facebook, one of the world’s most popular social media websites marked its 10th anniversary. It is winter in the Northern Hemisphere and severe winter weather is affecting the lives of people in many parts of the world. Researchers are trying to find out why people who are blind have a better sense of hearing than those who can see.  They're hoping they can apply what they learn to developing a new treatment for hearing loss.


February 01, 2014

New Canadian Study Analyzes Bad Dreams and Nightmares

Waking up in the morning after having a bad dream at night might not be the best way to start the day, but, a terrifying nightmare can rock you awake from a sound sleep, leaving you scared and confused.  A new study released by psychology researchers Geneviève Robert and Antonio Zadra at the University of Montreal has revealed that nightmares indeed pack a much bigger emotional punch than simply having a bad dream. Also… With the Winter Olympics about to begin, a new study that examines the affect a warmer world has had on past and will have on future winter games. We'll learn about the role St. Louis, Missouri played in boosting aviation in the 1920's and spaceflight in the 1990's. Some of our ancient human ancestors acquired some skin genes that helped them survive outside Africa by mating with Neanderthals. Harlem Biospace, in New York, is the first city-backed incubator facility for biomedical engineering.  It gives young entrepreneurs a relatively low-cost way to develop their ideas and businesses. 

February 2014

Science World is VOA’s on-air and online blog covering science, health, technology and the environment.

Rick PantaleoHosted by Rick Pantaleo, Science World‘s informative, entertaining and easy-to-understand presentation offers the latest news, features and one-on-one interviews with researchers, scientists, innovators and other newsmakers.


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Science World begins after the newscast on Friday at 2200, Saturday at 0300, 1100 and 1900 and Sunday at 0100, 0400, 0900, 1100 and 1200. The program may also be heard on some VOA affiliates after the news on Saturday at 0900 and 1100. (All times UTC).
 

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