radio / Science World

Join host Rick Pantaleo to examine global issues in science, technology, health, agriculture, and the environment on Science World.

Upcoming program

Saturday August 02, 2014

Geologist Gregory Retallack from the University of Oregon, studied images of the Martian landscape as well as mineral and chemical data that were both captured and sent to Earth by the Mars Rover, Curiosity.

The images and data revealed that the soil he studied dated back to some 3.7 billion years ago, providing him with evidence that Mars was once, a long time ago, a much warmer and wetter planet than it is today.

Professor Retallack joins us today to talk about his research and how Mars, at one time, could have been habitable.

Also… The Ebola outbreak in West Africa, so far, has claimed hundreds of lives and infected even many more. Officials at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and other international health agencies are working hard to reduce the spread of the infection.

New proposed rules to cut pollution from the 600 coal-fired power plants here in the United States are generating a heated debate.   Those who are for or against the new rules are making sure that the US Environmental Protection Agency knows just how they feel before any new rules are enacted.

There is good news and bad news in the fight against malaria. First the bad news: Research indicates drug-resistant malaria is spreading across Southeast Asia.  The good news: a new anti-malarial drug looks promising in an early test.

We’ll learn about the “FabLab” at Kenya's University of Nairobi and its role in using 3-D prototyping to spark a manufacturing revolution throughout the country.

Officials with the European Space Agency say its Rosetta spacecraft will soon reach the comet it has been chasing for the past ten years.   And we’ll hear what the space agency is hoping to learn from its up-close study and hoped-for landing on the comet.

These stories and more are coming up for you on VOA's science, health and technology magazine, "Science World."

April 2014

April 26, 2014

Four Species of Carnivorous "Killer" Sponges Discovered

Four new species of carnivorous killer sponges have been recently discovered. No, it's not the pllot to some cheap Hollywood horror movie the new sponge species was made by Lonnny Lundsten, a marine biologist at California’s Monterey Bay Aquarium Institute and two Canadian researchers. Lonny Lundsten joins us for today’s One on One segment to talk about what he and his colleagues found and what they’ve learned about these unique sea creatures.

Also...
We earthlings are lucky.  Between 2000 and 2013 at least 26 asteroids from space have hit the earth with the force of an atomic bomb, and three former astronauts tell us it's only by chance that one of them hasn't hit a large urban area. How can we avoid a catastrophe in the future?  We'll tell you what scientists have to offer.

There's a new tool scientists have for understanding climate change from the past...including what led to the Ice Ages.

We'll have these stories and more on this edition of VOA's Science, Health and Technology magazine, Science World!


April 19, 2014

Physicists Confirm Existence of New Subatomic Particle

An international team of physicists working with CERN's Large Hadron Collider in Switzerland announced this week that they have confirmed the existence of a new and mysterious subatomic particle called a tetraquark hadron.   We'll talk with Syracuse University’s Dr. Tomasz Skwarnicki who is one of the lead authors of a paper that details this discovery.

And...

Astronomers have announced the discovery of a planet where it's not too hot or not too cold for liquid water on the surface, which could mean it could be a world with life-friendly conditions.

After examining a photo of a bright protrusion on the edge of one of Saturn's outer rings, scientists are now thinking that the ringed planet may be creating a new moon

These stories and more are coming up for you on VOA's science, health and technology magazine, "Science World."


April 12, 2014

High-Tech Concrete Will Ensure Stronger and Longer Lasting Roads and Bridges

On today’s program we talk with two scientists who are developing ways to make a new, high-tech concrete. Why is that important?  They hope their new forms of concrete may someday help ensure that that our roads, bridges and buildings are more solidly built, last longer and provide a number of other benefits.

Also…

Scientists recently announced that the weather phenomenon known as El Nino is returning and could bring some extreme weather with it.  In fact, they say the El Nino might become the big weather story of the year.

Public health officials are praising newly developed drugs that can eradicate the deadly disease Hepatitis C.  Now scientists are working to make those drugs cheaper so that more people around the world can afford the treatments.

These stories and more are coming up for you on this edition of VOA's science, health and technology magazine, "Science World.


April 05, 2014

Our Unconscious Mind May Be a Good Lie Detector

A newly published study shows that we humans are pretty bad lie detectors when trying to tell if someone is trying to deceive us.  

The study's author says that instead of looking for classic signs of lying such as averted eyes or fidgeting we may be better off trusting our own intuition to determine whether or not someone is telling us the truth.  

Today we’ll talk with the study’s author on our One on One Segment.

And…

Scientists have confirmed a nine year old theory that there's a huge lake of liquid beneath on one of the moons of Saturn and that this moon may be a good place to search for non-Earth life forms.

The World Health Organization is trying to calm what seems to be a sense of panic in some areas about the severity of the Ebola outbreak in the West African country of Guinea.  

These stories and more are coming up for you on VOA's science, health and technology magazine, "Science World."
 

April 2014

Science World is VOA’s on-air and online blog covering science, health, technology and the environment.

Rick PantaleoHosted by Rick Pantaleo, Science World‘s informative, entertaining and easy-to-understand presentation offers the latest news, features and one-on-one interviews with researchers, scientists, innovators and other newsmakers.


Listen to a Recent Program

MP3 | Windows Media | Podcasts

 

Broadcast Schedule

Science World begins after the newscast on Friday at 2200, Saturday at 0300, 1100 and 1900 and Sunday at 0100, 0400, 0900, 1100 and 1200. The program may also be heard on some VOA affiliates after the news on Saturday at 0900 and 1100. (All times UTC).
 

Contact Us:

E-Mail

science@voanews.com
 

Postal Mail
Science World
Voice of America
330 Independence Ave., SW
Washington, DC 20237
USA

Calendar

Feature Story

FILE - Men read newspapers with headlines about the Ebola Virus in Lagos, Nigeria.

Photogallery Nigeria Using Facebook, Twitter to Inform People About Ebola

Nigerian government says communication is its first line of defense against Ebola More