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Join host Rick Pantaleo to examine global issues in science, technology, health, agriculture, and the environment on Science World.

May 2014

May 31, 2014

UK Scientists Find Evidence that High-Energy Solar Particles Trigger Lightning on Earth

According to a new study by scientists at the UK's University of Reading, Empedocles, an ancient Greek philosopher may have been on to something back in the 5th century, BC when he said that lightning was created in the clouds by the rays of the Sun. The British researchers say that they've found evidence that lightning strikes on Earth may be trigged by the high-energy particles generated by the Sun and sent toward our atmosphere by the powerful solar wind. We'll talk with the study's lead author in our One on One Segment. Also… Some hopeful news for those who are afraid to smile because of damaged teeth.  Scientists are now saying that someday a laser may help re-grow human teeth ... giving us all reason to smile. Three new crew members have been rocketed up on another fast-track six hour launch-to-docking mission to the International Space Station We've had several reports in the past about the health dangers of sitting still... and the benefits of exercise or even simply increased motion.  Today we'll hear how sitting less and getting a little more exercise can even help some people who suffer with chronic back, muscle and joint pain. President Obama this week hosted the White House Science Fair, which once again featured extraordinary science projects and experiments from some of America’s most innovative students There are now about 2.1 billion obese people in the world. A new study finds that global obesity rates are climbing. The greatest gain in weight is found in developing countries. These stories and more are coming up for you on VOA's science, health and technology magazine, "Science World."


May 24, 2014

Ice Melt is Making the Ground Rise in Antarctica

Researchers at Newcastle University in the UK have found yet another way the polar ice melt is affecting the Antarctic landscape.  We'll talk with one the authors of a study that found the ground that was pushed into the Earth's crust by the heavy ice is springing back faster than expected. NASA has Ok’d the construction of a new Mars probe that will study the interior of the red planet and provide some insight into how planets like Earth were created. Anthropologists in Argentina have uncovered bones of what they say may have been the biggest dinosaur that ever lived. Scientists have developed a new experimental malaria vaccine that uses a protein to trap and kill the disease causing parasites. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration released its annual Atlantic Hurricane Season Outlook this past week.  We’ll have a report that examines some of the tools forecasters use to make their predictions. Back in the 1980’s American pop artist Andy Warhol did some experimentation with what was then a brand new computer called the Amiga.  We’ll find out how art and science came together to save Warhol's computer art. These stories and more are coming up for you on VOA's science, health and technology magazine, "Science World."  


May 17, 2014

Astronomers Spot a Coronal Hole in the Sun

Astronomers using NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory recently found an odd looking square shaped hole in sun.  According to NASA these holes, called coronal holes aren't anything to be worried about.  Today, on our One on One Segment, Dr. Dean Pesnell, the project scientist of NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory will tell us about coronal holes. And… A Spanish researcher says he has found that we humans aren't ready to meet ET.  The researcher's report indicates that humans are just too stupid and too influenced by religion to be able to handle an encounter with an intelligent extraterrestrial being. While we may not be able to meet ET, the World Health Organization this week gave us some good news and said that we're healthier and living longer than we did in 1990. Swiss scientists have developed a robotic arm that can catch items thrown at it with split-second accuracy. Antarctica seems to have bucked the global warming trend, with portions of it cooling, while the rest of the planet heats up.   U.S. researchers say a common anti-depressant drug appears to slow the growth of brain plaques that are the hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. These stories and more are coming up for you on VOA's science, health and technology magazine, "Science World."  


May 10, 2014

Study Shows that Neaderthals Weren't Inferior to Modern Humans

A pair of researchers said that they've found no real proof that backs up the stereotype of the knuckle dragging, brutish, pre-historic relative of modern man -- the Neanderthal.  Instead there's quite of bit of archeological evidence that suggests that the Neanderthals were more advanced that had been previously thought. And… The periodic table of elements has a new addition this week after researchers discovered a new superheavy element. The W-H-O is declaring a worldwide public health emergency -- warning us that the global threat of polio is back. U.S. scientists have discovered a protein in the blood in young mice can reverse some of the effects of aging in old mice.  That same protein is also present in human blood. While researchers have found that global temperatures are consistently rising, a new study finds there are distinct differences, depending on where you live.  


May 03, 2014

Fabien Cousteau's Underwater 'Mission-31' Set to Begin in June

Fabien Cousteau, grandson of the legendary underwater explorer Jacques Cousteau is getting ready to launch a new mission that will take him and his team under the sea to live and work for 31 days. We'll learn more about the upcoming Mission-31 when Mr. Cousteau joins us on this week's One on One Segment. And… Astronomers this week found an exoplanet that's out in space spinning like a top.  It's the first time the rotation of a planet outside our solar system has been measured. Antibiotics have long been a powerful tool in fighting infections...but now, there over-use could make then a major threat to public health. Coral reefs are being killed at a rapid pace by rising ocean temperatures and increasing acidity. We’ll hear how heat tolerant corals could lead to new ways of conserving these precious reefs. Scientists have come across the coldest brown dwarf star that's been detected so far.   A new non-invasive breath test has been developed that detects lung cancer.   For the first time astronomers have gotten 3 D images of a cosmological entity whose structure, until now has been only theoretical in nature. These stories and more are coming up for you on VOA's science, health and technology magazine, "Science World."  

May 2014

Science World is VOA’s on-air and online blog covering science, health, technology and the environment.

Rick PantaleoHosted by Rick Pantaleo, Science World‘s informative, entertaining and easy-to-understand presentation offers the latest news, features and one-on-one interviews with researchers, scientists, innovators and other newsmakers.


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Science World begins after the newscast on Friday at 2200, Saturday at 0300, 1100 and 1900 and Sunday at 0100, 0400, 0900, 1100 and 1200. The program may also be heard on some VOA affiliates after the news on Saturday at 0900 and 1100. (All times UTC).
 

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US Gay Marriage Ruling Yields Real-life Impacti
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Michael Bowman
June 28, 2015 10:05 PM
Friday’s landmark Supreme Court decision legalizing same-sex marriage throughout the United States is an outcome few thought possible just years ago, and shows a nation that increasingly tolerates and even celebrates the hopes and aspirations of gay people. VOA’s Michael Bowman spoke to a same-sex couple that will benefit from the high court ruling, and to a Christian scholar who is apprehensive about its potential consequences for America’s faith community.
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Video US Gay Marriage Ruling Yields Real-life Impact

Friday’s landmark Supreme Court decision legalizing same-sex marriage throughout the United States is an outcome few thought possible just years ago, and shows a nation that increasingly tolerates and even celebrates the hopes and aspirations of gay people. VOA’s Michael Bowman spoke to a same-sex couple that will benefit from the high court ruling, and to a Christian scholar who is apprehensive about its potential consequences for America’s faith community.
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Video Syrians Flee IS Advance in Hasaka

The Syrian government said Monday it has taken back one of several districts in Hasaka overrun by Islamic State militants. But continued fighting elsewhere in the northern city has forced thousands of civilians from their homes. In this report narrated by Bill Rodgers, VOA Kurdish Service reporter Zana Omer describes the scene in Amouda, where some of the displaced are taking refuge.
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Video Rabbi Hits Road to Heal Jewish-Muslim Relations in France

France is on high alert after last week's terrorist attack near the city Lyon, just six months after deadly Paris shootings. The attack have added new tensions to relations between French Jews and Muslims. France’s Jewish and Muslim communities also share a common heritage, though, and as far as one French rabbi is concerned, they are destined to be friends. From the Paris suburb of La Courneuve, Lisa Bryant reports about Rabbi Michel Serfaty and his friendship bus.
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Video S. Korea Christians Protest Gay Rights Festival

The U.S. Supreme Court decision mandating marriage equality nationwide has energized gay rights supporters around the world. Gay rights remain a highly contentious issue in a key U.S. ally, South Korea, where police did a deft job Sunday of preventing potential clashes between Christian protesters and gay activists. Kurt Achin reports from Seoul.
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Video Saudi Leaks Expose ‘Checkbook Diplomacy’ In Battle With Iran

Saudi Arabia’s willingness to wield its oil money on the global diplomatic stage appears to have been laid bare, after the website WikiLeaks published tens of thousands of leaked cables from Riyadh’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs. VOA's Henry Ridgwell reports.
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Video Nubians in Kenya Face Land Challenges

East Africa's ethnic Nubians have a rich cultural history that dates back thousands of years, but in Kenya they are facing hardships, including the loss of lands they have lived on for generations. They say the government has reneged on its pledge to award them title deeds for the plots. VOA's Lenny Ruvaga reports.
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Video Syrian Refugees Return to Tal Abyad

Syrian refugees in Turkey confirm they left their hometown of Tal Abyad because of intense fighting and coalition airstrikes, not because Kurdish fighters were engaged in ethnic cleansing, as some Turkish officials charged. VOA Kurdish Service reporter Zana Omer, in Tal Abyad, finds that civilians coming back to the town agree, as we hear in this report narrated by Roger Wilkison.
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Video Military Experts Question New Russian Tank Capabilities

Russia has been showing off its new tank design – the Armata T-14. Designers claim it is 20 years ahead of current Western designs - and driving it feels like playing a computer game. But military analysts question those assertions, and warn the cost could be too heavy a burden for Russia’s struggling economy. Henry Ridgwell reports.
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Video In Kenya, Police Said to Shoot First, Ask Questions Later

An organization that documents torture and extrajudicial killings says Kenyan police were responsible for 1,252 shooting deaths in five cities, including Nairobi, between 2009 and 2014, representing 67 percent of all gun deaths in the areas reviewed. Gabe Joselow has more from Nairobi.
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Video In Syrian Crisis, Social Media Offer Small Comforts

Za’atari, a makeshift city in Jordan, may be the only Syrian refugee camp to tweet its activities, in an effort to keep donors motivated as the war in Syria intensifies and the humanitarian crisis deepens. Inside the camp, families say mobile phone applications help hold together families that are physically torn apart. VOA’s Heather Murdock reports.
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Video Chemical-Sniffing Technology Fights Australia's Graffiti Vandals

Cities and towns all over the world spend huge amounts of resources battling graffiti writers who deface buildings, public transport vehicles and even monuments. Authorities in Sydney, Australia, hope a new chemical-sniffing technology finally will stop vandals from scribbling on walls in the passenger areas of commuter trains. VOA’s George Putic has more.
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Video Cambodia Struggling to Curb Child Labor

Earlier this year a United Nations report found 10 percent of Cambodian children aged 7-14 are working – one of the highest rates in the region – and said one in four children in that age bracket are forced to quit school to help their families. Although the child labor rate has dropped over the past decade, Cambodia has a lot more to do – including keeping more children in school. Robert Carmichael reports for VOA from Phnom Penh.

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