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Join host Rick Pantaleo to examine global issues in science, technology, health, agriculture, and the environment on Science World.

June 2014

June 28, 2014

Researchers Find New Evidence of Oceans of Water Deep Inside Earth

A Geophysicist and a seismologist recently found new evidence that deep beneath the surface of our planet lies what could very well be the largest reservoir of water on Earth.  We'll talk with one of the researchers to learn more about their studies and the evidence for their finding. And… The solar energy market is growing rapidly so scientists are looking for more inexpensive and environmentally friendly ways of harnessing the sun's power. NASA's Mars rover Curiosity recently sent a selfie it had taken of itself back to Earth to celebrate its first Mars Year on the Red Planet.  A Martian year is equal to 687 Earth Days. Security experts say those who defend computer systems first need to be able to hack them to understand their weaknesses.  So, tech-savvy kids in San Diego are learning to hack computers. We've talked about the growing problem of the growing amount of space debris a number of times on our program. Now, the European Space Agency is planning to do its part to solve this potentially dangerous problem. A new study says that people, who are low in Vitamin D, appear to be at higher risk for developing high blood pressure/hypertension, which is a risk factor for heart disease and diabetes.   This past week, the UN’s World Meteorological Organization released its El Niño prediction and says that the world can expect hotter, dryer and wetter weather toward the end of the year. These stories and more are coming up for you on VOA's science, health and technology magazine, "Science World."


June 21, 2014

Weather Forecasters are Prediciting Another El Nino to Develop Soon

Just a few weeks ago the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Climate Prediction Center said that there's a 70% chance of the climate phenomenon known as El Niño would be developing during the Northern Hemisphere sometime this summer but an 80% chance of it during this coming fall and winter. An El Niño develops as the result of warming waters in the equatorial Pacific but often impacts weather systems around the world.  El Niño’s have been blamed for droughts, floods, famine and even wars. Today on our One on One segment we’ll learn about El Nino, the impact it could have on global weather, as well as what we might expect if an El Nino develops as predicted. And... A couple of clever inventors have come up with a new microscope that’s made of paper and only costs $1.  But despite its unconventional construction and inexpensive price, the microscope called the Foldscope is pretty powerful and can magnify samples by 2,000 times. U.S. President Barack Obama announced, this past Tuesday, a new initiative that calls for the creation of the world's largest marine preserve by expanding a remote region of the Pacific Ocean where drilling, fishing and other commercial activities are prohibited. Researchers have discovered that mutations to a particular gene can dramatically lower the risk for heart attack.  So, scientists are now trying to develop drugs that target the gene in the hopes of bringing down the high rate of heart disease.   One of the most wide-spread conspiracy theories of recent years has concerned a radio-frequency facility in a remote part of Alaska, started by the military in 1993 and known by its acronym HAARP.  Critics allege the government was trying to control the weather or even people's minds.  But now scientists who worked at the facility are saying that those fears are unfounded and are fighting to keep the program alive.


June 14, 2014

Mt. Tambora: The Eruption that Changed the World

On our One on One Segment we talk with the author of a new book about the 1815 eruption of Indonesia’s Mt. Tambora, one of most explosive volcanic eruptions of the last several thousand years. Also… Scientists think that one of the best ways to help rid the world of malaria is to get rid of most of the female mosquitoes.  So they’ve come up with a way to produce mostly male mosquito offspring. We’ll hear about a Washington, DC area community science club that is providing a special place for people, especially kids, to work on science projects and hobbies. German researchers have developed a new 3-D X-ray machine that can look inside living insects for a detailed picture of how they move - as they move. A new study shows that the human face evolved so that it could take a punch.  The authors of the paper said it suggests a pugilistic past where violence was key to our evolution. Engineers have long taken taking cues from nature in designing new and innovative products.  We’ll find out what lessons scientists have learned from the sticky tongues of frogs.  


June 07, 2014

Getting A Good Night's Sleep is Important - Five Steps to Quality Sleep

We'll learn more about how important getting a good night's sleep is to our health and well-being from Mark Underwood, a neuroscience researcher.  He'll also share some tips on ways we can improve our own sleep quality. And... A team of scientists announced this past week that they discovered two new planets orbiting a star that is nearly as old as the universe. Farmers are relying on a lot more on technology and various agri-business services to reduce costs and improve yields and profits. We look at one of those services. We have a report about how the human/robot connection was apparent at this year's International Conference of Robotics and Automation in Hong Kong. Mt. Vesuvius blew its top back in 79 AD and totally destroyed the ancient Roman city of Pompeii. Now the California Science Center, in Los Angeles, is presenting the history, and the science, behind the tragedy. A new study shows the microbes that help us digest our food can be damaged by malnutrition and that the damage can continue long after being treated. The Obama administration recently prposed stronger regulations to limit climate-changing emissions from U.S. power plants.   These stories and more are coming up for you VOA's science, health and technology magazine, "Science World."

June 2014

Science World is VOA’s on-air and online blog covering science, health, technology and the environment.

Rick PantaleoHosted by Rick Pantaleo, Science World‘s informative, entertaining and easy-to-understand presentation offers the latest news, features and one-on-one interviews with researchers, scientists, innovators and other newsmakers.


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Science World begins after the newscast on Friday at 2200, Saturday at 0300, 1100 and 1900 and Sunday at 0100, 0400, 0900, 1100 and 1200. The program may also be heard on some VOA affiliates after the news on Saturday at 0900 and 1100. (All times UTC).
 

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Rolling Thunder Run Reveals Changed Attitudes Towards Vietnam Wari
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Katherine Gypson
May 25, 2015 1:32 AM
For many US war veterans, the Memorial Day holiday is an opportunity to look back at a divisive conflict in the nation’s history and to remember those who did not make it home.
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Video Rolling Thunder Run Reveals Changed Attitudes Towards Vietnam War

For many US war veterans, the Memorial Day holiday is an opportunity to look back at a divisive conflict in the nation’s history and to remember those who did not make it home.
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Turkey’s AK (Justice and Development) Party is seeking a fourth successive general election victory, with the goal of securing two-thirds of the seats in Parliament to rewrite the constitution and change the country's parliamentary system into a presidential one. To achieve that, the party will need to win seats in opposition strongholds like the western city of Izmir. Dorian Jones reports.
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Video Millions Flock to Ethiopia Polls

Millions of Ethiopians cast their votes Sunday in the first national election since the 2012 death of longtime leader Meles Zenawi. Mr. Meles' party, the Ethiopian People's Revolutionary Democratic Front, is almost certain of victory again. VOA's Anita Powell reports from Addis Ababa.
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As stability returns to the once lawless nation of Somalia, the world football governing body, FIFA, is helping to rebuild the country’s sport sector by training referees as well as its young footballers. Abdulaziz Billow has more from Mogadishu.
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In its fifth year, FoodCorps puts more than 180 young Americans into 500 schools across the United States, where they focus on teaching students about nutrition, engaging them with hands-on activities, and improving their access to healthy foods whether in the cafeteria or the greater community. Aru Pande has more.
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In the U.S., people used to grow up in small towns with a main street lined by family-owned shops and restaurants. Today, however, many main streets are worn down and empty because shoppers have been lured away by shopping malls. But in the Del Ray neighborhood of Alexandria, Virginia, main street is thriving. VOA’s Deborah Block reports it has a nostalgic feel with its small restaurants and unique stores.

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