radio / Science World

Join host Rick Pantaleo to examine global issues in science, technology, health, agriculture, and the environment on Science World.

July 2014

July 25, 2014

Globally, June 2014 Was the Hottest June on Record says NOAA

This week (July 21, 2014), US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced that this past June was the hottest June since record keeping began in 1880.  On today's One on One segment we'll talk with Dr. Jessica Blunden, the author of that report, to learn more about the record breaking temperatures and the conditions that control our climate. And... Leading space experts recently gathered at NASA headquarters here in Washington DC to discuss the search for life beyond Earth.  We'll hear what the experts had to say about discovering potentially habitable worlds out in the cosmos. The weeklong 20th International Aids Conference came to a close on Friday. Seals are foraging for food at offshore wind farms and underwater pipes according to a study that describes this new behavior.   Social media and email user who represent themselves through 2D photos or cartoon images may soon have new 3D avatars to use. A fossil found in Inner Mongolia may prove that birds did not evolve from dinosaurs, as many scientists have believed, but from a creature that existed long before.   A fly with a remarkable sense of hearing is the model for what may be a new generation of hypersensitive hearing aids and other sonic devices.   These stories and more are coming up for you on VOA's science, health and technology magazine, "Science World."


July 19, 2014

New Technology Provides Hope to Those with Spinal Cord Injuries

On today’s program we'll learn how a new device that was recently implanted into a young quadriplegic man allowed him to move his paralyzed hands and fingers by using only his thoughts.  We'll talk with one of the lead researchers of project that led to the development of this device. And… Throughout the world non-native species, such as plants, animals and insects cost an estimated $1.4 trillion in damage every year.  Today we'll hear how U-S scientists are trying to control invasive insect species, by pitting these insects against each another. U.S. scientists, experimenting with a harmless virus have created what they describe as a "biological" pacemaker to keep the human heart beating normally. Researchers, studying the teeth of our pre-historic ancestors in Africa, have learned they not only used plants for food, but also as medicine. We’ll tell you about a new United Nations report that warns our privacy is being threatened by digital surveillance.   Today on our Science World Quick Quiz we mark the 45th Anniversary of the first moon landing. These stories and more are coming up for you on VOA's science, health and technology magazine, "Science World."


July 12, 2014

Climate Change is Impacting the Food Supply of Marine Life on the West Antarctic Peninsula

A new long-term study, recently published by the journal Nature, is linking changing climate with marine life along the rapidly warming West Antarctic Peninsula.  The paper discloses how factors such as fluctuations in wind speed and sea-ice cover can set off a chain of events up through the local food chain, impacting all living creatures from single-celled algae to penguins.  Dr. Grace Saba, an Assistant Research Professor at Rutgers University’s Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences is the lead author of the new study. She joins us today for our One on One segment to talk about her team’s research and the impact climate change is having and will have on marine life in the West Antarctic Peninsula. And... Wednesday, July 16, 2014, marks the forty-fifth anniversary of the launch of the Apollo 11...the mission that put the first humans on the moon.  This feat was the climax of an incredibly fierce competition between the U.S. and the former Soviet Union. We'll take a look back at what became known as the 'Space Race'. By the time the international whaling moratorium went into effect in 1986, the commercial whaling industry had nearly wiped out the world's whale population.  Since then the population of whales has made a comeback. And, we'll find the ways the whale population is serving to improve the ocean environment. Children are becoming sick with tuberculosis at a much higher rate than previously estimated, according to a new study.  The new study presents the first-ever estimate of the scope of new TB infections among children: nearly 8 million in 2010.   The versatile papyrus plant is a light but strong reed that grows well in shallow, fresh water.  Restoring the papyrus swamps, where the reeds were grown centuries ago, could hold the key to solve many of today's problems, from pollution to water wars. Researchers say they have evidence that the malaria parasite lurks in bone marrow, the spongy tissue inside bones where blood cells are produced. The scientists say that their discovery offers hope that new treatments can be found to fight the disease.    These stories and more are coming up for you on VOA's science, health and technology magazine, "Science World."


July 04, 2014

New Horizons is Zooming Across the Solar System for July 2015 Rendezvous With Pluto

Today, we talk with Hal Weaver, the project scientists of NASA’s New Horizons mission to Pluto and beyond.   The mission's spacecraft will travel five Billion kilometers for its rendezvous with the Pluto, its moons and a couple of Kuiper Belt Objects in about a year from now. Also… NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 was launched earlier this week and will monitor atmospheric carbon dioxide - the heat-trapping gas thought to be responsible for much of Earth's global warming. International public health officials have announced plans to eliminate TB in the more than 30 countries that already have low rates of infection.   In the scramble for a slice of the $200-Billion commercial satellite launch industry, India took another step this past week by launching satellites from four nations.   We'll hear about a new study that shows Malaria may make people smell more alluring to mosquitoes... something that researchers think just might increase the spread of this dreaded disease. Members of the public recently got a sneak preview of futuristic immersive media technologies that are being developed by film and game industry artists along with computer scientists at the University of Southern California's Mixed Reality Lab. Health ministers from across West Africa met in an emergency conference to discuss the regional outbreak of Ebola virus disease.  The highly infectious disease, according to the WHO has killed more than 400 people in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. These stories and more are coming up for you on VOA's science, health and technology magazine, "Science World."

July 2014

Science World is VOA’s on-air and online blog covering science, health, technology and the environment.

Rick PantaleoHosted by Rick Pantaleo, Science World‘s informative, entertaining and easy-to-understand presentation offers the latest news, features and one-on-one interviews with researchers, scientists, innovators and other newsmakers.


Listen to a Recent Program

 | Windows Media | Podcasts

 

Broadcast Schedule

Science World begins after the newscast on Friday at 2200, Saturday at 0300, 1100 and 1900 and Sunday at 0100, 0400, 0900, 1100 and 1200. The program may also be heard on some VOA affiliates after the news on Saturday at 0900 and 1100. (All times UTC).
 

Contact Us:

E-Mail

science@voanews.com
 

Postal Mail
Science World
Voice of America
330 Independence Ave., SW
Washington, DC 20237
USA

Calendar

Feature Story

President Barack Obama, right, pardons "Cheese," the turkey at the White House in Washington, Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2014.

Americans Celebrate Thanksgiving

Feasts centering on turkeys with an array of traditional sides and desserts are part of the holiday's traditions, which falls on the fourth Thursday in November More