News / USA

US Culinary School Draws Students from Around the Globe

October 01, 2014 5:27 PM
Once small vocational school now has four campuses, with 300 of its students coming from 48 other countries More

Video Hundreds of California Households Struggle With No Water

Drought has left hundreds of households in state's usually fertile Central Valley without water

Video Hundreds of California Households Struggle with No Water

California is undergoing its third year of severe drought, and the water shortage is affecting farms, cities, and small communities. As Mike O'Sullivan reports from East Porterville, California, the drought has left hundreds of households in the state's Central Valley without water.

Video US Culinary School Draws Students from Around the Globe

In 1946, when the American military returned from the World War II, a small vocational culinary institution was established for veterans in the northeastern United States. Today, it is called the Culinary Institute of America - with three campuses in the United States and one in Singapore. More than 12 percent of the student body is from outside the United States. VOA’s Bernard Shusman reports from its main campus in Hyde Park, New York.

Video US Professor Unlocks Humor Code

The American author E.B. White once observed, “Analyzing humor is like dissecting a frog. Few people are interested and the frog dies of it.” That has not deterred a business professor in Colorado, however, who has traveled the world seeking ways to crack the humor code. Not only that, he has taken up an especially challenging task for a scientist -- taking the stage as a stand-up comedian. From Boulder Colorado, Shelley Schlender reports for VOA.

Fun Run Preps US West Coast for Massive Earthquake

It's not often you hear 'fun' and 'tsunami' in the same sentence, but both words inform theme, purpose of inaugural 'Race the Wave' 5K fun run in Cannon Beach, Oregon

World Bank Chief: Ebola Shows 'Deadly Cost' of Inequality

Speaking in Washington, Jim Yong Kim says poverty, lack of health infrastructure key reasons for quick spread of virus in parts of Africa

Report: US Manufacturing Grows More Slowly

Bloomberg predicts a net gain of 215,000 jobs across the economy, while they predict unemployment rate will be unchanged at 6.1 percent

Concerned, US Airlines Contact Government About Ebola

Airlines for America trade group is discussing actions government, CDC are taking to address health concerns

Photogallery Texas Governor Says Children Had Contact with Ebola Patient

Rick Perry says health officials are keeping watch on as many as 18 people who came in contact with patient

US Secret Service Director Resigns

Julia Pierson faced tough questions from Congress this week after two serious breaches in security last month

Audio US 'Green Card' Lottery Registration Begins

Random computer selection will happen in May; winners then meet with State Department employees to answer questions

Video Obama, Netanyahu Air Views on Palestinians, Iran

President says Israel, Palestinians have to find ways 'to change the status quo' to resolve issues that led to 50 days of recent fighting in Gaza

Video The Legacy of Jimmy Carter: The Preacher from Plains

It is common in the United States to see tourists flock to sites associated with America's presidents. Some are privately owned and others are run by the National Park Service or the National Archives -- but most have helped draw business and people into the towns and cities where they are located. As VOA’s Kane Farabaugh reports, there is one particular presidential hometown that is unique in what it has to offer those who make the trip.

Video India's PM Continues First US Visit

India's prime minister is on his first visit to Washington, to strengthen political and economic ties between the world's oldest and the world biggest democracies. He came to the U.S. capital from New York, the first stop on his five-day visit to the country that denied him an entry visa in the past. From Washington, Zlatica Hoke reports Modi seemed most focused on attracting foreign investment and trade to increase job opportunities for his people.

NASA to Drop Former Marine Helicopter to Test New Airframe Design

Inside the former Marine helicopter airframe will be crash test dummies, cameras and accelerometers

Video At Age 90, Former President Jimmy Carter is Still Going Strong

Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter celebrates his 90th birthday October 1. While not the oldest living president, Carter has set the record for the longest post-presidency of any former occupant of the White House, surpassing Herbert Hoover for the honor in 2012. And he shows no signs of slowing down.

Video Afghan BSA Signed to Promote Country's Stability

Afghanistan has signed long-delayed security pacts with the United States and NATO to authorize a small international military force in the country after the end of the year. VOA’s Carla Babb has the story.

Interviewing President Carter

Over 11 interviews with the former President, VOA's Kane Farabaugh has learned quite a bit about the man and the world

Video At Age 90, Former President Jimmy Carter is Still Going Strong

The accomplishments of Carter’s presidency include normalizing relations with China, returning the Panama Canal to Panama and negotiating the Camp David Peace Accords

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The Legacy of Jimmy Carter: The Preacher from Plainsi
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October 01, 2014 10:45 AM
It is common in the United States to see tourists flock to sites associated with America's presidents. Some are privately owned and others are run by the National Park Service or the National Archives -- but most have helped draw business and people into the towns and cities where they are located. As VOA’s Kane Farabaugh reports, there is one particular presidential hometown that is unique in what it has to offer those who make the trip.
Video

Video The Legacy of Jimmy Carter: The Preacher from Plains

It is common in the United States to see tourists flock to sites associated with America's presidents. Some are privately owned and others are run by the National Park Service or the National Archives -- but most have helped draw business and people into the towns and cities where they are located. As VOA’s Kane Farabaugh reports, there is one particular presidential hometown that is unique in what it has to offer those who make the trip.
Video

Video Hong Kong Protests Draw New Supporters on National Holiday

On the 65th anniversary of the founding of Communist China, Hong Kong protesters are hoping to stage the largest pro-democracy demonstration since the 1989 Tiananmen protests. VOA's Brian Padden visited one of the protest sites mid-day, when the atmosphere was calm and where the supporters were enthusiastic about joining what they are calling the umbrella revolution.
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Video India's PM Continues First US Visit

India's prime minister is on his first visit to Washington, to strengthen political and economic ties between the world's oldest and the world biggest democracies. He came to the U.S. capital from New York, the first stop on his five-day visit to the country that denied him an entry visa in the past. From Washington, Zlatica Hoke reports Modi seemed most focused on attracting foreign investment and trade to increase job opportunities for his people.
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Video Malaysia Struggles to Stop People Joining Jihad

Malaysian authorities say militant groups like the so-called "Islamic State" have used social media to entice at least three dozen Malaysian Muslims to fight in what they call "jihad" in Syria and Iraq. As Mahi Ramkrishnan reports from Kuala Lumpur, counterterrorism police are deeply worried about what could happen when these militants return home.
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Video Could US Have Done More to Stop Rise of Islamic State?

President Obama says airstrikes against Islamic State militants in Syria will likely continue for some time because, in his words, "there is a cancer that has grown for too long." So what if President Obama had acted sooner in Syria to arm more-moderate opponents of both the Islamic State and the Syrian government? VOA State Department Correspondent Scott Stearns reports from the United Nations.
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Video Treasure Hunters Seek 'Hidden Treasure' in Central Kenya

Could a cave in a small village in central Kenya be the site of buried treasure? A rumor of riches, left behind by colonialists, has some residents dreaming of wealth, while others see it as a dangerous hoax. VOA's Gabe Joselow has the story.
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Video Ebola Patients Find No Treatment at Sierra Leone Holding Center

At a holding facility in Makeni, central Sierra Leone, dozens of sick people sit on the floor in an empty university building. They wait in filthy conditions. It's a 16-hour drive by ambulance to Kailahun Ebola treatment center. Adam Bailes was there and reports on what he says are some of the worst situations he has seen since the beginning of this Ebola outbreak. And he says it appears case numbers may already be far worse than authorities acknowledge.
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Video Identifying Bodies Found in Texas Border Region

Thousands of immigrants have died after crossing the border from Mexico into remote areas of the southwestern United States in recent years. Local officials in south Texas alone have found hundreds of unidentified bodies and buried them in mass graves in local cemeteries. Now an anthropologist and her students at Baylor University have been exhuming bodies and looking for clues to identify them. VOA’s Greg Flakus has more from Waco, Texas.
Colonel Steve ‘Spiros’ Pisanos left Greece and came to the U.S. to learn to fly. He flew fighters for the Allies in World War II, narrowly escaping death multiple times.Colonel Steve ‘Spiros’ Pisanos left Greece and came to the U.S. to learn to fly. He flew fighters for the Allies in World War II, narrowly escaping death multiple times.

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