News / USA

US Airstrikes Anger Syrian Civilians Fleeing Their Homes

A general view shows a damaged school that was targeted on Monday by what activists said were U.S.-led air strikes, at Ain al-Arous town in Raqqa governorate, October 1, 2014.

October 02, 2014 5:37 AM
Pentagon officials say they have seen no credible evidence of civilian deaths caused by US airstrikes against Islamic State militants More

Respiratory Virus Linked to Four Deaths in US

The CDC said at least 500 people in 42 states and the District of Columbia have been sickened by the EV-68 virus

Los Alamos National Laboratory May Have Incorrectly Disposed of Radioactive Waste

Operations at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant were suspended in February after an accident released high levels of radiation and contaminated 22 workers

Mother Says Former US Marine Needs Treatment, Not Mexican Prison

Jill Tahmooressi said son Andrew, 26, has been threatened by prison guards with rape, torture and execution since his arrest in March

Video Ebola Spread Fuels Fear Among Americans, Africans

Surveys show many Americans are afraid the Ebola virus might spread inside the US

Video US Waivers Could Send Mixed Signals on Use of Child Soldiers

Waivers shield six countries from being fully subjected to penalties under the Child Soldiers Prevention Act, which requires the US to cut off some forms of military assistance

Video Ebola Spread Fuels More Fear Among Americans, Africans

News that a Texas man was diagnosed with Ebola after returning home from a visit to Liberia has raised new concerns about the spread of the disease. For health workers the stakes are particularly high - more than 120 have died in West Africa since the Ebola outbreak began early this year. In the United States, public health experts are working to reassure the public, and medical workers, that the virus does not endanger communities here. VOA's Carol Pearson has more.

Video US Waivers Could Send Mixed Signals on Use of Child Soldiers

President Barack Obama has waived restrictions against providing military aid to six countries cited this year for using child soldiers. The countries, mostly in Africa, were among nine listed by the State Department in a June report on human trafficking. The waivers shield six countries from being fully subjected to penalties under the Child Soldiers Prevention Act. As VOA State Department correspondent Pam Dockins reports, there is concern that the waivers send out the wrong message.

Video Hundreds of California Households Struggle with No Water

California is undergoing its third year of severe drought, and the water shortage is affecting farms, cities, and small communities. As Mike O'Sullivan reports from East Porterville, California, the drought has left hundreds of households in the state's Central Valley without water.

Poll: Mostly Economy on US Voters’ Minds

With November midterm elections looming, for nine in 10 Americans economy is ‘extremely or very important issue’

Video Obama, Netanyahu Air Views on Palestinians, Iran

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu paid a visit to the White House Wednesday and urged President Barack Obama to stand firm against Iran’s nuclear ambitions, while Obama called for a sustainable peace between Israel and the Palestinians. VOA White House correspondent Luis Ramirez reports.

Somali-American Gets 30 Years for Christmas Bomb Plot

Mohamed Osman Mohamud was found guilty of plotting to bomb a Christmas-tree lighting ceremony in Portland, Oregon, nearly four years ago

Video Law Professionals in US Find Passion in Alternate Careers

Across the country, more and more lawyers are turning their backs on their legal careers to become entrepreneurs

Video Law Professionals Find Passion in Alternate Careers

A large number of lawyers in the U.S. are turning their backs on their legal careers to start a business in another field. VOA’s Julie Taboh profiles a Washington-area lawyer who left his job to venture into a very different but more satisfying career.

Video No Joke: US Professor Unlocks Humor Code

Peter McGraw takes his research out of classroom, around the globe - and onto the stage as a stand-up comedian to determine what makes something funny

Video US Culinary School Draws Students from Around the Globe

Once small vocational school now has four campuses, with 300 of its students coming from 48 other countries

Video Hundreds of California Households Struggle With No Water

Drought has left hundreds of households in state's usually fertile Central Valley without water

Video Hundreds of California Households Struggle with No Water

California is undergoing its third year of severe drought, and the water shortage is affecting farms, cities, and small communities. As Mike O'Sullivan reports from East Porterville, California, the drought has left hundreds of households in the state's Central Valley without water.

Video US Culinary School Draws Students from Around the Globe

In 1946, when the American military returned from the World War II, a small vocational culinary institution was established for veterans in the northeastern United States. Today, it is called the Culinary Institute of America - with three campuses in the United States and one in Singapore. More than 12 percent of the student body is from outside the United States. VOA’s Bernard Shusman reports from its main campus in Hyde Park, New York.

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The Legacy of Jimmy Carter: The Preacher from Plainsi
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October 01, 2014 10:45 AM
It is common in the United States to see tourists flock to sites associated with America's presidents. Some are privately owned and others are run by the National Park Service or the National Archives -- but most have helped draw business and people into the towns and cities where they are located. As VOA’s Kane Farabaugh reports, there is one particular presidential hometown that is unique in what it has to offer those who make the trip.
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Video The Legacy of Jimmy Carter: The Preacher from Plains

It is common in the United States to see tourists flock to sites associated with America's presidents. Some are privately owned and others are run by the National Park Service or the National Archives -- but most have helped draw business and people into the towns and cities where they are located. As VOA’s Kane Farabaugh reports, there is one particular presidential hometown that is unique in what it has to offer those who make the trip.
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Video Hong Kong Protests Draw New Supporters on National Holiday

On the 65th anniversary of the founding of Communist China, Hong Kong protesters are hoping to stage the largest pro-democracy demonstration since the 1989 Tiananmen protests. VOA's Brian Padden visited one of the protest sites mid-day, when the atmosphere was calm and where the supporters were enthusiastic about joining what they are calling the umbrella revolution.
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Video India's PM Continues First US Visit

India's prime minister is on his first visit to Washington, to strengthen political and economic ties between the world's oldest and the world biggest democracies. He came to the U.S. capital from New York, the first stop on his five-day visit to the country that denied him an entry visa in the past. From Washington, Zlatica Hoke reports Modi seemed most focused on attracting foreign investment and trade to increase job opportunities for his people.
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Video Malaysia Struggles to Stop People Joining Jihad

Malaysian authorities say militant groups like the so-called "Islamic State" have used social media to entice at least three dozen Malaysian Muslims to fight in what they call "jihad" in Syria and Iraq. As Mahi Ramkrishnan reports from Kuala Lumpur, counterterrorism police are deeply worried about what could happen when these militants return home.
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Video Could US Have Done More to Stop Rise of Islamic State?

President Obama says airstrikes against Islamic State militants in Syria will likely continue for some time because, in his words, "there is a cancer that has grown for too long." So what if President Obama had acted sooner in Syria to arm more-moderate opponents of both the Islamic State and the Syrian government? VOA State Department Correspondent Scott Stearns reports from the United Nations.
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Video Treasure Hunters Seek 'Hidden Treasure' in Central Kenya

Could a cave in a small village in central Kenya be the site of buried treasure? A rumor of riches, left behind by colonialists, has some residents dreaming of wealth, while others see it as a dangerous hoax. VOA's Gabe Joselow has the story.
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Video Ebola Patients Find No Treatment at Sierra Leone Holding Center

At a holding facility in Makeni, central Sierra Leone, dozens of sick people sit on the floor in an empty university building. They wait in filthy conditions. It's a 16-hour drive by ambulance to Kailahun Ebola treatment center. Adam Bailes was there and reports on what he says are some of the worst situations he has seen since the beginning of this Ebola outbreak. And he says it appears case numbers may already be far worse than authorities acknowledge.
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Video Identifying Bodies Found in Texas Border Region

Thousands of immigrants have died after crossing the border from Mexico into remote areas of the southwestern United States in recent years. Local officials in south Texas alone have found hundreds of unidentified bodies and buried them in mass graves in local cemeteries. Now an anthropologist and her students at Baylor University have been exhuming bodies and looking for clues to identify them. VOA’s Greg Flakus has more from Waco, Texas.
Colonel Steve ‘Spiros’ Pisanos left Greece and came to the U.S. to learn to fly. He flew fighters for the Allies in World War II, narrowly escaping death multiple times.Colonel Steve ‘Spiros’ Pisanos left Greece and came to the U.S. to learn to fly. He flew fighters for the Allies in World War II, narrowly escaping death multiple times.

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